Rotterdam – blog in English

The outbreak of the war and the German occupation of Belgium made a big impression on the Dutch. The tension caused by the war in the surrounding countries cast its shadow over the country; maintaining neutrality required an enormous effort. The years of mobilization and army readiness were a battle of attrition for the Dutch soldiers.

Queen Wilhelmina visits reinforcements of the Dutch army. Fig. L’Evénement Illustré, October 16, 1915

Thousands of Belgian refugees came across the border and asked for help from the Dutch population. A message in the

The Rockefeller Foundation also made extensive donations of flour to occupied Belgium. It resulted in this Decorated Flour Sack in the collection of the War Heritage Institute, Brussels

Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant tells about the provision of humanitarian aid by a Rotterdam women’s committee, with support from the American Rockefeller Foundation, a philanthropic institution with a clear vision: they are willing to help on condition that benefactors are willing to work. And so, 80 Belgian women have started sewing and knitting shirts and underpants:

In response to the great demand for underwear, some of the ladies in this field have initiated a small-scale trial to get Belgian women to sew for their unfortunate fellow countrymen. That this initial test promises to be a great success is due to the unexpected and incredibly appreciated help of three American gentlemen sent by the “Rockefeller Foundation for War Relief.” Mr. Jenkinson, Dr. Rose and Mr. Bicknell have been commissioned to travel throughout Europe to see where help is most needed. Having arrived in our country, they also found great need here, especially among the Belgian refugees due to the forced inactivity. They are willing to help them if there is a desire to work, and they want to start a test in Rotterdam which, if it succeeds, will be continued throughout the country. If this test fails, they will withdraw their promise.
A committee has been formed, consisting of the aforementioned ladies and Mr. Jenkinson; In a few days, this committee set over 80 Belgian women in the Uranium hotel to sew and knit. With great willingness and gratitude, these women now work for their countrymen; 75 pieces of men’s clothes are delivered per day. 1/3 of this goes to refugees in Rotterdam; 2/3 mainly to the interned Belgian soldiers. All costs of sewing machines, fabric, etc. are borne by the Americans, who thereby indirectly do a great service to the country, and are entitled to great gratitude. The committee sincerely hopes that our city will not lose the high opinion that America has of Rotterdam and that it will show with dignity the confidence it has placed in it.(NRC January 7, 1915)

 

SS Lynorta, moored in the Maashaven in Rotterdam, has crossed the Atlantic with 5600 tons of relief supplies, both donations from the state of Virginia and purchases by the CRB. January 1915. Fig. La Belgique and la Guerre [1]
Transshipment of flour sacks from the state of Virginia into a barge. Fig. Literary Digest, May 8, 1915

The city of Rotterdam played a unique role in the success of international aid to the Belgian population through the hospitality provided to the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).
The port of Rotterdam was the place where the CRB brought all relief supplies with ocean steamers and then transshipped them on inland vessels for transport to Belgium.

The CRB headquarters were located in London and the CRB set up an office in Rotterdam to coordinate transport.

 

Copy of letter of January 19, 1915 from CRB Rotterdam to CRB Brussels with the announcement that all telegram costs from Rotterdam to Belgium or London are borne by the Dutch government. State Archives of Belgium

In “A History of the C.R.B.” Tracy B. Kittredge [2] described the history of the CRB in Rotterdam. The CRB representative, the American Captain Lucey and some employees, first moved into the office of Furness & Co. On November 21, 1914, the office moved to its own location at Haringvliet 98.

The CRB office at Haringvliet 98, Rotterdam. Fig. La Belgique and la Guerre [1]
Mr. J.M. Haak was manager of the office, Mr. Van der Sluis was head of the shipping department and was responsible for the organization of the inland vessels that sailed to Belgium and the handling of the goods in the port of Rotterdam, the Maashaven, to be precise. A transshipment that was usually carried out at record speed. Mr Van den Branden was the Belgian representative of the NKHV / CNSA and was mainly concerned with financial operations. In December 1914 the American C.A. Young followed Captain Lucey as director of CRB Rotterdam.

The employees of the CRB in Rotterdam in 1915/1916. Eight ladies, seven of them with hats, are in the second row. Bottom row, third from the right is Mr. Joseph Jean De Pooter (Antwerp, 8/3 / 1875-16 / 12/1940) **, next to him, on the left in the photo, is Lewis Richards. Fig. La Belgique and la Guerre [1]
The office was well organized and efficient and worked at low costs; over the years it grew into an organization of dozens of employees. Mistakes were not made, it formed a strong contrast to the CRB office in Brussels, which sometimes managed to blunder in the execution of business, according to Tracy Kittredge in his historiography.

The Rotterdam Yearbook from 1915-1919 contained a daily chronicle of important events in the city and provides insight into the state of affairs in Rotterdam during WWI. Read here about the arrival of food products for Belgians, noted in the Rotterdam Yearbook:

Transshipment of relief supplies for occupied Belgium in the Maashaven, Rotterdam. Fig. La Belgique and la Guerre [1]
November 1914:
24 Today, the J. Blockx steamship has arrived from London, carrying a load of food for the Belgians

December 1914:
3 The Thelma steamship arrives from New York with 1740 tons of food for the Belgians.
8 The Denewell steamship from Kurrachee (Karachi, Pakistan) arrived here last night with 6,000 tonnes of food for the Belgians.
18 The steamship Orn arrives from Philadelphia with around 1900 tons of food for the Belgians
20 The steamships Memento from London and Dorie from Halifax arrive here with food for the Belgians
27 Steamship Agamemnon from New York arrives here with food for the Belgians
28 The Neches steamship from New York arrives here with food for the Belgians
29 This afternoon the Maskinonge steamship from New York arrived here with food for the Belgians
30 The Batiscan steamship from Philadelphia arrives here with about 6700 tonnes of wheat for the Belgians.
31 Since 1 January, the Nieuwen Waterweg has welcomed, destined for Rotterdam 7547 ships against 10527 in 1913, thus a reduction of 2980 ships, measuring 3,595,744 tons.

January 1915:
2. The London steamship Lincluden arrives here with food for the Belgians.
8. The Calcutta steamship has arrived here from Halifax with wheat and other food for the Belgians
11. Arriving here with wheat for the Belgians are the steamships: Kentigern from New York, Rio Lages from New Orleans and Ferrona from Philadelphia.

December 1915
31. Since January 1, the Nieuwen Waterweg, has welcomed 3760 ships, destined for Rotterdam, measuring 4,224,805 net register tons, i.e. compared to the clearance before the war. The number of incoming inland vessels was 161,604 with a volume of 24,836,418 tons.

 

Inland vessels are waiting for their cargo for occupied Belgium in the Maashaven. Fg. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Kittredge has provided figures of CRB relief supplies that have been brought to the port of Rotterdam during the first year 1914-1915:
– On November 15, 1914, the first ship with relief supplies arrived: the SS “Tremorvah” with 5,000 tons of foodstuffs, a gift from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia.
– From mid-November 1914 to mid-November 1915, 186 full shiploads and 308 partial shiploads arrived.
– In the first operational year, CRB Rotterdam received a total of 988,852 tons of goods.

Transfer of wheat with the “Stadsgraanzuiger II”, a floating grain elevator in the Maashaven. Fig. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
If I compare these CRB figures with the figures from in the Rotterdam Yearbook, I conclude that the port of Rotterdam owed several tens of percent of its activity to the transit of goods to Belgium.

The unique role of the city of Rotterdam is personally meaningful to me with regard to my WWI flour sacks research.
I have lived in Rotterdam for 10 years, not far from the port. From the Erasmus University where I studied, we had a view of the Maas and saw ships passing by.
There appears to be little knowledge about the history of the CRB and the decorated flour sacks in WWI. It feels useful to be able to record a forgotten history of the city and the port.

Flour sacks destined for occupied Belgium in the hold of an inland vessel. The logos and prints on the flour sacks will later serve as embroidery patterns for Belgian embroiderers. Fig. La Belgique and la Guerre [1]
My research shows that the port of Rotterdam is the only location in the world where all flour sacks from WWI have to have been!

Rotterdam was the transport center:
– The sacks of flour were supplied from various North American locations: ports, both on the east and west coast;
– The transit of flour sacks with inland vessels went to different Belgian ports, such as Antwerp, Ghent, Brussels, Liège.

So: every flour sack in WWI traveled through Rotterdam between 1914-1919!

 

Rotterdam on the Maas, 2019

However, the unique place that Rotterdam has occupied as a port in providing assistance to occupied Belgium did unfortunately not result in a collection of any decorated flour sacks in Rotterdam.

Glass sack on the blowing pipe. Photo: Selma Hamstra
Blowing glass in Rotterdam. Photo: Selma Hamstra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fortunately I was inspired to write this blog about Rotterdam thanks to the start-up of “Glass Blowing Studio Keilestraat” in the Nieuw Mathenesse harbor area between Keilehaven and Lekhaven.

Glass sack, full of memory. Photo: Selma Hamstra

For years I had hoped to be able to blow glass in Rotterdam.
Last week was the day: A big “Thank you” to Selma Hamstra, she offered me together with my colleague Yvon Trossèl a pleasant and warm hospitality in her studio. It was a great opportunity to breathe new life into a sack full of memories!

 

**) Joseph Jean de Pooter is Paul Bekkers’ maternal grandfather, who responded to this blog. De Pooter lived at Nieuwe Binnenweg 274b. In his collection is a list of CRB employees signatures, dated 9/16/1918

 

Footnotes:
[1] Rency, Georges (Stassart, Albert), La Belgique et la Guerre. I. La Vie Matérielle de la Belgique durant la Guerre Mondiale. Bruxelles: Henri Bertels, Editeur, 1922

[2] Kittredge, Tracy B., A History of the C.R.B., The History of The Commission for Relief in Belgium 1914-1917. London: Crowther & Goodman Limited, Printers, 1918

Rotterdam

Het uitbreken van de oorlog en de Duitse bezetting van België maakten in Nederland grote indruk. De spanning van de oorlog in de omringende landen wierp zijn schaduw over het land; het handhaven van de neutraliteit vroeg een enorme inspanning. De jarenlange mobilisatie en paraatheid van het leger was een uitputtingsslag voor de Nederlandse militairen.

Koningin Wilhelmina bezoekt versterkingen van het Nederlandse leger. Afb. L’Evénement Illustré, 16 oktober 1915

Duizenden Belgische vluchtelingen kwamen de grens over en deden een beroep op hulpverlening van de Nederlandse bevolking. Een bericht in de

De Rockefeller Foundation deed ook omvangrijke schenkingen meel aan het bezette België. Daaruit resulteert deze Versierde Meelzak in de collectie van het War Heritage Institute, Brussel

Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant vertelt over het verstrekken van humanitaire hulp door een Rotterdams dames comité, met ondersteuning van de Amerikaanse Rockefeller Foundation, een filantropische instelling met duidelijke visie: ze zijn bereid te helpen op voorwaarde dat de wil tot werken bestaat. Dus hebben 80 Belgische vrouwen zich aan het naaien en breien gezet van hemden en onderbroeken:

‘Bij de groote vraag naar ondergoed hebben eenige dames te dezer stede op kleine schaal een proef genomen om Belgische vrouwen te laten naaien voor hun ongelukkige landgenooten. Dat die aanvankelijke proef een groot succes belooft te worden, is te danken aan de onverwachte en niet genoeg te waardeeren hulp van drie Amerikaansche heeren, gezonden door de ‘Rockefeller foundation for war relief’. De heeren Jenkinson, dr. Rose en mr. Bicknell hebben in opdracht door heel Europa te reizen, om te zien, waar hulp het noodigst is. In ons land gekomen, vonden zij ook hier grooten nood, vooral ook onder de Belgische vluchtelingen door de gedwongen ledigheid. Zij zijn bereid hen te helpen, wanneer van hun kant de wil tot werken bestaat, en zij willen in Rotterdam een proef nemen die, als zij slaagt, over het geheele land zal worden voortgezet. Mislukt deze proef, dan trekken zij hunnen belofte terug.
Een comité heeft zich gevormd, bestaande uit bovengenoemde dames en den heer Jenkinson; dit comité heeft in enkele dagen ruim 80 Belgische vrouwen in het Uranium-hotel aan het naaien en breien gezet. Met groote bereidwilligheid en dankbaarheid werken nu deze vrouwen voor hun landgenooten; per dag worden er 75 stuk mannenkleeren afgeleverd. 1/3 hiervan komt ten goede aan vluchtelingen te Rotterdam; 2/3 hoofdzakelijk aan de geïnterneerde Belgische militairen. Alle kosten van naaimachines, stof, enz. worden gedragen door de Amerikanen, die hierdoor indirect het land een grooten dienst bewijzen, en aanspraak mogen maken op groote dankbaarheid. De commissie hoopt van harte, dat onze stad den hoogen dunk, dien Amerika van Rotterdam heeft, niet zal doen verloren gaan en dat zij zich het in haar gestelde vertrouwen ten volle waardig zal toonen.’ (NRC 7 januari 1915)

SS Lynorta, afgemeerd in de Maashaven in Rotterdam, is de Atlantische Oceaan overgestoken met 5600 ton hulpgoederen, zowel schenkingen uit de staat Virginia als aankopen door de CRB. Januari 1915. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Zakken meel uit de staat Virginia worden overgeladen in een binnenschip. Afb. Literary Digest, 8 mei 1915

De stad Rotterdam heeft een unieke rol gespeeld bij het welslagen van de internationale hulpverlening aan de Belgische bevolking: het verleende gastvrijheid aan de Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).
De Rotterdamse haven was de plaats waar de CRB met oceaanstomers alle hulpgoederen aanvoerde en vervolgens overlaadde op binnenvaartschepen voor het vervoer naar België.

Het hoofdkantoor van de CRB was gevestigd in Londen en voor de coördinatie van het transport richtte de CRB een kantoor op in Rotterdam.

Doorslag van brief van 19 januari 1915 van CRB Rotterdam aan CRB Brussel met de mededeling dat alle telegrammen naar België en Londen voor rekening zullen zijn van de Nederlandse overheid. Rijksarchief in België

In ‘A History of the C.R.B.’ beschrijft Tracy B. Kittredge [2] de geschiedenis van de CRB in Rotterdam. De CRB-vertegenwoordiger, de Amerikaan Captain Lucey en enkele medewerkers, namen om te beginnen hun intrek in het kantoor van Furness & Co. Op 21 november 1914 verhuisde het kantoor naar een eigen locatie aan het Haringvliet 98.

Het CRB kantoor aan het Haringvliet 98, Rotterdam. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
De heer J.M. Haak was manager van het kantoor, de heer Van der Sluis stond aan het hoofd van de ‘shipping department’ en was verantwoordelijk voor de organisatie van de binnenvaartschepen die naar België voeren en de overslag van de goederen in de Rotterdamse haven, om precies te zijn, de Maashaven. Een overslag die veelal in recordtempo werd uitgevoerd. De heer Van den Branden was de Belgische vertegenwoordiger van het NKHV/CNSA en hield zich vooral bezig met de financiële operaties. In december 1914 volgde de Amerikaan C.A. Young Captain Lucey op als directeur van CRB Rotterdam.

De medewerkers van de CRB in Rotterdam in 1915/1916. Acht dames, waarvan zeven met hoed, staan op de tweede rij. Onderste rij, derde van rechts is de heer Joseph Jean De Pooter (Antwerpen, 8/3/1875-16/12/1940)**, naast hem, links op de foto, zit Lewis Richards. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Het kantoor was goed georganiseerd en efficiënt en werkte tegen lage kosten; het groeide in de loop van de jaren uit tot een organisatie van tientallen medewerkers. Fouten werden er niet gemaakt, het stond in schrille tegenstelling tot het CRB kantoor in Brussel, dat nog wel eens wist te blunderen bij de uitvoering van zaken, aldus Tracy Kittredge in zijn geschiedschrijving.

Het Rotterdams Jaarboekje van 1915-1919 bevat een dagelijkse kroniek van belangrijke gebeurtenissen in de stad en geeft inzicht in de gang van zaken in Rotterdam tijdens WOI.
Lees hier over de aankomst van voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen, genoteerd in het Rotterdams Jaarboekje:

Overslag van hulpgoederen voor bezet België in de Maashaven, Rotterdam. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
November 1914:
24 Heden is uit Londen alhier aangekomen het stoomschip J. Blockx, met een lading voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen

December 1914:
3 Het stoomschip Thelma komt uit New York hier aan met 1740 ton voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen.
8 In den afgelopen nacht is het stoomschip Denewell uit Kurrachee (Karachi, Pakistan) alhier aangekomen met 6000 ton voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen.
18 Het stoomschip Orn komt uit Philadelphia hier aan met ongeveer 1900 ton voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen
20 De stoomschepen Memento uit Londen en Dorie uit Halifax komen hier aan met voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen
27 Stoomschip Agamemnon uit New-York komt hier aan met voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen
28 Het stoomschip Neches uit New York komt hier aan met voedingsmiddelen voor de Belgen
29 Hedenmiddag is het stoomschip Maskinonge uit New York alhier aangekomen met levensmiddelen voor de Belgen
30 Het stoomschip Batiscan uit Philadelphia komt hier aan met ongeveer 6700 ton tarwe voor de Belgen.
31 Sedert 1 Januari zijn den Nieuwen Waterweg binnen gekomen, bestemd voor Rotterdam 7547 schepen tegen 10527 in 1913, aldus een vermindering van 2980 schepen, metende 3.595.744 ton.

Januari 1915:
2. Het stoomschip Lincluden uit Londen komt hier aan met levensmiddelen voor de Belgen.
8. Het stoomschip Calcutta is uit Halifax hier aangekomen met tarwe en andere levensmiddelen voor de Belgen
11. Hier aangekomen met tarwe voor de Belgen zijn de stoomschepen: Kentigern uit New-York, Rio Lages uit New-Orleans en Ferrona uit Philadelphia.

December 1915
31. Sedert 1 Januari zijn den Nieuwen Waterweg binnengekomen, bestemd voor Rotterdam, 3760 schepen, metende 4.224.805 netto registerton, d.w.z. Vg van de inklaring vóór den oorlog. Het aantal der ingekomen schepen van de binnenvaart bedroeg 161.604 met een inhoud van 24.836.418 ton.

Binnenvaartschepen wachten op hun vracht voor bezet België in de Maashaven. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Kittredge geeft cijfers over het eerste jaar 1914-1915 van goederen die in de Rotterdamse haven voor de CRB zijn aangevoerd:
– Op 15 november 1914 was de aankomst van het eerste schip met hulpgoederen: het SS ‘Tremorvah’ met 5000 ton voedingsmiddelen, een schenking van de Canadese provincie Nova Scotia.
– Van half november 1914 tot half november 1915 kwamen 186 volledige scheepsladingen en 308 gedeeltelijke scheepsladingen aan.
– Totaal ontving CRB Rotterdam in het eerste operationele jaar 988.852 ton aan goederen.

Overslag van tarwe met de ‘Stadsgraanzuiger II’, een drijvende graanelevator in de Maashaven. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Als ik de cijfers van de CRB afzet tegen de cijfers van december 1915 in het Jaarboekje Rotterdam, maak ik op dat de Rotterdamse haven enkele tientallen procenten van haar bedrijvigheid dankte aan de doorvoer van goederen naar België.

De unieke rol van de stad Rotterdam is voor mij persoonlijk betekenisvol voor mijn onderzoek naar de versierde meelzakken in WOI.
Ik heb 10 jaar in Rotterdam gewoond, niet ver van de haven. Vanuit de Erasmus Universiteit waar ik studeerde, hadden we uitzicht op de Maas en zagen schepen voorbijtrekken.
Er blijkt weinig kennis te bestaan over de geschiedenis van de CRB en de versierde meelzakken in WOI. Het doet me daarom goed nu een stuk vergeten historie van de stad en de haven te kunnen optekenen.

Zakken meel bestemd voor bezet België in het ruim van een binnenvaartschip. De logo’s op de meelzakken zullen later dienen als borduurpatronen voor Belgische handwerksters. Afb. La Belgique et la Guerre [1]
Mijn onderzoek toont aan dat de Rotterdamse haven de enige plaats in de wereld is waar alle meelzakken van WOI moéten zijn geweest!
Rotterdam was het transport centrum:
– De aanvoer van de zakken meel gebeurde vanuit diverse Noord-Amerikaanse plaatsen: havens, zowel aan de oost- als de westkust;
– De doorvoer van de meelzakken met binnenvaartschepen ging naar diverse Belgische plaatsen: havens, zoals Antwerpen, Gent, Brussel, Luik.
Dus: Iedere meelzak in WOI is tussen 1914-1919 via Rotterdam gereisd!

Rotterdam aan de Maas, 2019

Echter, de unieke plaats die Rotterdam als haven inneemt in de hulpverlening aan bezet België, vertaalt zich niet in het Rotterdamse bezit van enige versierde meelzak.

Glazen buidel aan de blaaspijp. Foto: Selma Hamstra
Glasblazen in Rotterdam. Foto: Selma Hamstra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gelukkig heb ik inspiratie gekregen voor dit zakkenblog over Rotterdam dankzij de opstart van Glasblazerij Keilestraat in het havengebied Nieuw Mathenesse tussen de Keilehaven en de Lekhaven.

Glazen buidel: Zak vol herinnering. Foto: Selma Hamstra

Al jaren hoopte ik ooit in Rotterdam te kunnen glasblazen.
Vorige week was het zover: met dank aan Selma Hamstra voor de aangename, warme gastvrijheid aan collega Yvon Trossèl en mij. Zij bood me de gelegenheid een zak vol herinnering nieuw leven in te blazen!

 

**) Joseph Jean de Pooter is de grootvader langs moeders kant van Paul Bekkers, die reageerde nav deze blog. De Pooter woonde Nieuwe Binnenweg 274b. Hij bewaarde een lijst met alle handtekeningen van CRB-medewerkers, dd 16/9/1918

Voetnoten:

[1] Rency, Georges (Stassart, Albert), La Belgique et la Guerre. I. La Vie Matérielle de la Belgique durant la Guerre Mondiale. Bruxelles: Henri Bertels, Editeur, 1922

[2] Kittredge, Tracy B., A History of the C.R.B., The History of The Commission for Relief in Belgium 1914-1917. London: Crowther & Goodman Limited, Printers, 1918

From Lewis Richards via Berthe Smedt to Antoine Springael

A glimpse into my day of research on Thursday, March 13, 2019.
I am looking for connections in Brussels of Lewis Richards, member of the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).

Lewis Richards, CRB member from 1915-1919. Image: MSU Archives website

Richards came from Michigan, USA, I read on the website of the Michigan State University Archives, he was a musician, pianist, an American who studied at the conservatory in Brussels. He graduated cum laude and also found the love of his life.

In Brussels, he met Berthe Smedt, daughter of Charles Smedt, the restaurant owner of Grand Restaurant de la Monnaie in 13 Rue Leopold, just behind La Monnaie.

Berthe Smedt and Lewis Richards on their wedding day. Image: MSU Archives website

In 1908, Lewis (Lewis Loomis Richards, born in Saint Johns, Clinton County, Michigan, on April 11, 1881, died in Michigan in 1940) and Berthe (Berthée Emilie Smedt, born in Brussels on June 19, 1884) were married in Brussels.
It so happens that my grandparents Van Kempen were also married in 1908. A funny coincidence that makes history come alive for me.
The wedding photo of Berthe shows a “cloud” of a wedding dress. Imagine it would have been preserved, the photo displays such!

Berthe’s mother, Emilie Marie Jeanne Schamps, was born in Brussels on September 25, 1856. Charles Smedt (born in Brussels, December 24, 1852, died January 30, 1911, butcher by profession, then restaurant owner) ran a restaurant during the World Fair in Brussels from his Grand Restaurant de la Monnaie, a “succursale” called: “Chien Vert” (Green Dog).
The phenomenon of the 1910 World Exhibition amazes me because of its scale; it is worth a deeper dive. The exhibition area was 88 hectares in size, 26 countries had a pavillion there and it attracted 13 million visitors. No wonder that Restaurant du Chien Vert is located in a monumental building; even it only lasted for six months.
I imagine that Lewis Richards would have performed in atmospheric concerts in his father-in-law’s restaurant.

The Pavilion of restaurant “Chien Vert” (“Green Dog”) during the World Exhibition 1910 in Brussels

Photographs of the World Exhibition were printed on postcards and were collector’s items. Through the website “La Belgique des Quatre Vents” I get a good impression of the “Exposition Universelle de 1910 à Bruxelles et Tervueren“.

Poster for the “Procession of the Seasons”, design by Antoine Springael, 1910

My gaze is held by this poster. I recognize the lady in the middle … She is depicted on a flour sack!
I dive into my photo archive and find the painted flour sack by Antoine Springael in the “Moulckers Collection“.

Painted flour sack, Antoine Springael, 1915; Moulckers Collection, St. Edwards University, Tx, USA

What a find. Antoine Springael has drawn the poster for the “Cortège des Saisons” in July 1910 and later, in 1915, he depicted the same Goddess of Summer on the American Commission’s flour sack!
Quite funny to compare the warm colors of the inviting poster with the somewhat messy black-and-white photo on the postcard of the actual Cortège des Saisons.

“Procession of the Seasons” during the 1910 World Exhibition in Brussels
Excerpt from the Report of the Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement by M. Edgar, 1915

Back to Berthe Smedt and Lewis Richards.
In his work for the CRB (officially from January 1915) in Brussels, Lewis played a role in the sale of decorated flour sacks to Americans who came to Belgium accompanying the delivery of relief supplies.

Mr. Edgar from “The Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement” placed an order in March 1915, 105 years ago this month, for embroidered flour sacks. I wrote about it in my blog “A Celebrity Flemish Flour Bag in the Land of Nevele”.

Letter of thanks on behalf of the British Queen, 1917

In 1917 Richards worked for the CRB in London and sold two Belgian lace cushions to the British Queen.

In short, Lewis Richards was a man of standing, lived in Brussels in 1914-1915, ran with the wealthy circles in Brussels from the inside, spoke the language of both Belgians and Americans. He would have known what it was like, the history of the decorated flour sacks …

I find information about Richards’ work for the CRB in various sources:

1) Hugh Gibson, secretary of the United States Embassy in Brussels, writes in “A Journal from our Legation in Belgium“, 1917 (pp. 342-344):
“Christmas 1914.- Immediately after lunch we climbed into the big car and went out to Lewis Richards’ Christmas tree. He has a big house at the edge of town, with grounds which were fairy-like in the heavy white frost. He had undertaken to look after 600 children, and he did it to the Queen’s taste. They were brought in by mothers in bunches of one hundred, and marched around the house, collecting things as they went. In one room each youngster was given a complete outfit of warm clothes. In another, some sort of toy which he was allowed to choose. In another, a big bag of cakes and candies, and, finally, they were herded into the big dining-room, where they were filled with all sorts of Xmas food. There was a big tree in the hall, so that the children in their triumphal progress, merely walked around the tree. Stevens had painted all the figures and the background of an exquisite creche, with an electric light behind it, to make the stars shine. The children were speechless with happiness, and many of the mothers were crying as they came by.
Since the question of food for children became acute here, Richards has been supplying rations to the babies in this neighbourhood. The number has been steadily increasing, and for some time he has been feeding over two hundred youngsters a day. He has been very quiet about it, and hardly anyone has known what he was doing.
It is cheering to see a man who does so much to comfort others; not so much because he weighs the responsability of his position and fortune, but because he has great-hearted sympathy and instinctively reaches out to help those in distress. Otherwise the day was pretty black, but it did warm the cockles of my heart to find this simple American putting some real meaning into Christmas for these hundreds of wretched people. He also gave a deeper meaning for the rest of us.”

2) Tracy B. Kittredge has described Lewis Richards as one of the CRB’s most valuable employees. Quote of page 283 from “The History of The Commission for Relief in Belgium 1914-1917“:
“…in January 1916… was succeeded as general secretary by Mr. Lewis Richards, who had organised the Commission’s work in Greater Brussels. It was Mr. Richards who had devised and put into operation the card catalogue of the population of Brussels which had made possible the checking of the bread distribution and the combing out of some 150,000 extra rations of flour which had been distributed to bakers who had fraudulently padded their lists. Mr. Richards, after performing this service in Greater Brussels, had gone to Northern France in April 1915 as chief representative for the most important French district, that of the north, with headquarters at Valenciennes. After a few months there he went to Holland, where he helped in the Rotterdam office until Hoover asked him to return to Brussels to become general secretary. He remained at this post until July 1916, when he went out to Rotterdam again, this time to become assistant director of the Commission’s office there. Almost a year later he was called to London as assistant director of the central office of the Commission, in which capacity he is still serving. Mr. Richards, because of his experience and personal qualities, proved throughout his whole service to be one of the most valuable of the Commission’s representatives.”

3) In July 1919, a laudation about Richards’ CRB work appeared in The San Francisco Call and Post.

If a personal archive of his were to exist, it would have to be found in the archives of Michigan State University in East Lansing.

A long time ago, in 1981, I was on holidays in Michigan to visit some college friends I had made in the “American Law” course during my law studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam. If only I could have known then that I would later wish to be in East Lansing in my search for decorated flour sacks.
That is why I am starting a new research day today, closer to home, in search of the history of the Smedt family, daughter Berthe and son-in-law Lewis Richards in Brussels!

Van Lewis Richards via Berthe Smedt naar Antoine Springael

Een inkijkje in mijn onderzoeksdag van donderdag 13 maart 2019.
Ik ben op zoek naar de connecties in Brussel van Lewis L. Richards, medewerker van de Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).
Lewis Richards, medewerker CRB van 1915-1919. Foto: MSU Archives website

Richards kwam uit Michigan, VS,  lees ik op de website van de Michigan State University Archives, hij was musicus, pianist, een Amerikaan die studeerde aan het conservatorium in Brussel. Hij studeerde cum laude af en vond er ook de liefde van zijn leven.

In Brussel ontmoette hij Berthe Smedt, dochter van Emilie Schamps en Charles Smedt, de restauranthouder van Grand Restaurant de la Monnaie in Rue Léopold 7-13, net achter de Munt.
Berthe Smedt en Lewis Richards op hun huwelijksdag. Foto: MSU Archives website
In 1908 zijn Lewis (Lewis Loomis Richards, geboren in Sint Johns, Clinton County, Michigan, op 11 april 1881, overleden in Michigan in 1940) en Berthe (Berthée Emilie Smedt, geboren in Brussel op  19 juni 1884 ) in Brussel getrouwd.
Trouwens, mijn grootouders Van Kempen zijn ook getrouwd in 1908. Een grappige overeenkomst die de geschiedenis voor mij levend maakt.
De bruidsfoto van Berthe toont een ‘wolk’ van een huwelijksjapon. Stel dat die bewaard is gebleven, wat een weelde spreekt er uit de foto!
De moeder van Berthe, Emilie Marie Jeanne Schamps, was geboren in Brussel op 25 september 1856. Charles Smedt (geboren in Brussel, 24 december 1852, overleden op 30 januari 1911, van beroep slager, daarna restauranthouder) runde vanuit Grand Restaurant de la Monnaie tijdens de Wereldtentoonstelling van 1910 in Brussel ook daar een restaurant, een ‘succursale’ onder de naam ‘Chien Vert’.
Het fenomeen Wereldtentoonstelling 1910 verbaast me door de schaal en is enige verdieping waard. Het tentoonstellingsterrein was 88 hectare groot, 26 landen hadden er een paviljoen en het trok 13 miljoen bezoekers. Geen wonder dat Restaurant du Chien Vert gevestigd is in een monumentaal pand. Toch heeft dat maar voor zes maanden dienst gedaan.
Ik stel me zo voor dat Lewis Richards in het restaurant van zijn schoonvader zal zijn opgetreden in sfeervolle concerten.
Het Paviljoen van restaurant ‘Chien-Vert’ (‘Groene Hond) tijdens de Wereldtentoonstelling 1910 in Brussel
Foto’s van de Wereldtentoonstelling zijn op ansichtkaarten gezet en waren verzamelobject. Via de website ‘La Belgique des Quatre Vents’  krijg ik een goede sfeerimpressie van de ‘Exposition Universelle de 1910 a Bruxelles et Tervueren’.
Affiche voor de ‘Optocht der Seizoenen’, ontwerp van Antoine Springael, 1910

Bij deze affiche  blijft mijn blik hangen. Die dame in het midden herken ik…

Zij staat op een Meelzak!
Ik duik in mijn foto-archief en vind de beschilderde Meelzak van Antoine Springael in de ‘Moulckers Collection’.
Beschilderde Meelzak, Antoine Springael, 1915
Wat een vondst. Antoine Springael tekende het affiche voor de ‘Cortège des Saisons’ in juli 1910 en later, in 1915, zette hij deze Godin van de Zomer op de Meelzak van de American Commission!
Wel grappig om de warme kleuren van de uitnodigende affiche af te zetten tegen de wat rommelige  zwart-wit foto op de ansichtkaart van het daadwerkelijke Cortège des Saisons.
‘Optocht der Seizoenen’ tijdens de Wereldtentoonstelling 1910 in Brussel
Nu verder met Berthe Smedt en Lewis Richards.
Lewis speelde in zijn werk voor de CRB (officieel vanaf januari 1915) in Brussel een rol bij de verkoop van Versierde Meelzakken aan Amerikanen die hulpgoederen kwamen brengen.
Fragment uit het Report van de Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement door M. Edgar, 1915

Mr Edgar van ‘The Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement’ heeft in maart 1915, deze maand 104 jaar geleden, een bestelling gedaan van geborduurde Meelzakken. Ik schreef er over in mijn blog ‘Een Bekende Vlaamse Meelzak in het Land van Nevele’.

Bedankbrief namens de Britse vorstin, 1917

In 1917 werkte hij voor CRB in London en verkocht twee Belgische kanten kussens aan de Britse Koningin.

 

Kortom, Lewis Richards was een man van standing, leefde in 1914-1915 in Brussel, kende de gegoede kringen in Brussel van binnenuit, sprak de taal van zowel Belgen als Amerikanen. Hij heeft geweten hoe het zat, de ontstaansgeschiedenis van de Versierde Meelzakken…

Informatie over het werk van Richards voor de CRB vind ik in diverse bronnen:
1) Hugh Gibson, secretaris van de Amerikaanse ambassade in Brussel schrijft in ‘A Journal from our Legation in Belgium‘, 1917 (blz. 342-344):
“Christmas 1914.- Immediately after lunch we climbed into the big car and went out to Lewis Richards’ Christmas tree. He has a big house at the edge of town, with grounds which were fairy-like in the heavy white frost. He had undertaken to look after 600 children, and he did it to the Queen’s taste. They were brought in by mothers in bunches of one hundred, and marched around the house, collecting things as they went. In one room each youngster was given a complete outfit of warm clothes. In another, some sort of toy which he was allowed to choose. In another, a big bag of cakes and candies, and, finally, they were herded into the big dining-room, where they were filled with all sorts of Xmas food. There was a big tree in the hall, so that the children in their triumphal progress, merely walked around the tree. Stevens had painted all the figures and the background of an exquisite creche, with an electric light behind it, to make the stars shine. The children were speechless with happiness, and many of the mothers were crying as they came by.
Since the question of food for children became acute here, Richards has been supplying rations to the babies in this neighbourhood. The number has been steadily increasing, and for some time he has been feeding over two hundred youngsters a day. He has been very quiet about it, and hardly anyone has known what he was doing.
It is cheering to see a man who does so much to comfort others; not so much because he weighs the responsability of his position and fortune, but because he has great-hearted sympathy and instinctively reaches out to help those in distress. Otherwise the day was pretty black, but it did warm the cockles of my heart to find this simple American putting some real meaning into Christmas for these hundreds of wretched people. He also gave a deeper meaning for the rest of us.”
2) Tracy B. Kittredge beschrijft  Lewis Richards als een van de meest waardevolle medewerkers van de CRB.  Citaat van blz 283 uit ‘The History of The Commission for Relief in Belgium 1914-1917‘:
“…in January 1916… was succeeded as general secretary by Mr. Lewis Richards, who had organised the Commission’s work in Greater Brussels. It was Mr. Richards who had devised and put into operation the card catalogue of the population of Brussels which had made possible the checking of the bread distribution and the combing out of some 150,000 extra rations of flour which had been distributed to bakers who had fraudulently padded their lists. Mr. Richards, after performing this service in Greater Brussels, had gone to Northern France in April 1915 as chief representative for the most important French district, that of the north, with headquarters at Valenciennes. After a few months there he went to Holland, where he helped in the Rotterdam office until Hoover asked him to return to Brussels to become general secretary. He remained at this post until July 1916, when he went out to Rotterdam again, this time to become assistant director of the Commission’s office there. Almost a year later he was called to London as assistant director of the central office of the Commission, in which capacity he is still serving. Mr. Richards, because of his experience and personal qualities, proved throughout his whole service to be one of the most valuable of the Commission’s representatives.”
3) In juli 1919 verschijnt er een lovend artikel over het CRB-werk van Richards in The San Francisco Call and Post.
Voorzover er een persoonlijk archief van Lewis Richards is,  is die te vinden in de archieven van Michigan State University in East Lansing, VS.
Lang geleden, in 1981, was ik daar op vakantie om studievrienden te bezoeken die ik had leren kennen bij het vak ‘Amerikaans Recht’ tijdens mijn rechtenstudie aan de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. Weinig kon ik toen bevroeden dat ik later zou wensen in East Lansing te zijn in mijn zoektocht naar Versierde Meelzakken.
Daarom begin ik vandaag een nieuwe onderzoeksdag, dichterbij, op zoek naar de geschiedenis van de familie Smedt, dochter Berthe en schoonzoon Lewis Richards in Brussel!

Een Bekende Vlaamse Meelzak in Het Land van Nevele

‘Versierde Meelzak in WOI’, detail, collectie heemkundige kring Het Land van Nevele, Hansbeke (afb. auteur)

Dit is mijn tweede artikel over een versierde meelzak in WOI.

De hoofdpunten in het artikel zijn:

  • De Versierde Meelzak van de heemkundige kring Het Land van Nevele is in uitstekende staat, is veel in de publiciteit gebracht en krijgt van mij de titel ‘Bekende Vlaamse Meelzak’.
  • De identiteit van de Meelzak is bekend en dat is bijzonder: de bewoners van Caldwell, Kansas, schonken meel, de zak kwam in maart 1915 naar België via de hulpactie van het vakblad ‘The Northwestern Miller’ in Minneapolis.
  • De geschiedenis van de bewerking van onbewerkte meelzak tot Versierde Meelzak blijft onderwerp van verdere studie.

U kunt het artikel  hier lezen.