Artikel in Patakon

‘Geborduurde meelzakken in WO I: Aardige herinneringen, zeer dienstig als geschenk; het overschot is het spreken waard.
 De relikwie van een heldenvolk’.

Mijn eerste gedrukte artikel over de versierde meelzakken in WO I is verschenen!
23 bladzijden met tekst, foto’s en een selectieve bibliografie staan in het 2019-septembernummer van Patakon, het tijdschrift voor bakerfgoed van het Bakkerijmuseum in Veurne.

Samenvatting

Het artikel plaatst de vier meelzakken van WO I in het Bakkerijmuseum Veurne in hun geschiedkundige context.
Via historische krantenberichten en foto’s verbreed en verdiep ik het Belgisch perspectief op de herinneringscultuur van de versierde ‘Amerikaanse’ meelzakken.

Ferdine de Wachter toont haar versierde meelzak, 1915. (afb. Geschiedkundige Kring Rumesta).

Citaten uit 15 krantenberichten en 8 foto’s uit geïllustreerde tijdschriften, verschenen tussen 1914 en 1918, zijn gerelateerd aan de meelzakken.

7 andere foto’s illustreren de inzet van vrouwen, onder meer Madame Vandervelde wiens campagne voor voedselhulp in de VS resulteerde in meelzakken, bedrukt met de naam van haar eigen Madame Vandervelde Fund.

Borduurster Ferdine De Wachter staat als 18-jarige fier naast de door haar versierde meelzak.

Mijn research van de meelzakken in het Bakkerijmuseum leidde tot de ontdekking van opmerkelijke details.  De vondst van gelijkaardige meelzakken in andere collecties leverde via vergelijkend onderzoek met de drie versierde meelzakken in Veurne nieuwe conclusies op.

Versierde meelzak ‘Hunter’s Select’, Hunter Milling Co., Wellington, Kansas, 1915/1916. Coll. en foto Bakkerijmuseum Veurne

Daarnaast diepte ik historische informatie op over de herkomst van de meelzakken.

Het Bakkerijmuseum Veurne houdt vier meelzakken van WO I met zorg in bewaring.  In samenwerking met Ina Ruckebusch, wetenschappelijk medewerker/collectiebeheerder, is het artikel tot stand gekomen.

Je leest het artikel hier.

Detail van meelzak ‘Valleyfield’: Belgische en Franse vlag in verbleekte kleuren op de buitenkant. Coll. Bakkerijmuseum Veurne
Hetzelfde detail aan de binnenkant in frisse kleuren. Coll. Bakkerijmuseum Veurne. Beide afb. Annelien van Kempen.

 

 

Transformation of flour sacks with embroidery, needlework and lace

The aim of my research is, among other things, to unravel the mythical history of the origin of the decorated flour sacks in WWI. Decorated flour sacks in WWI are both embroidered, decorated with needlework and with lace, as though they were painted by artists. Flour sacks have been transformed into clothing.
Who had the idea of reusing the sacks and where and when did that start? Was it a Belgian initiative or did it happen on American suggestion?
To find answers to my questions, I systematically went through a number of Belgian newspapers and illustrated magazines from the end of 1914, beginning of 1915; these have been digitized and are available online.
I had already found some American publications before and combined them with the information from Belgium.
In my first of a series of four blogs, I have discussed the origin of reusing the flour sacks as clothing.

Decorated flour sack embroidered by Germaine Joly, École Moyenne, Saint-Gilles, Bruxelles. Fig. “From Aid to Art”, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987, Hoover Institution Library & Archives Collection, Stanford University, USA.

This second blog discusses the:
Transformation of flour sacks with embroidery, needlework and lace into decorated flour sacks. Belgian sources 1915.
Below are seven Belgian primary sources from 1915 about the origin of the decorated flour sacks.

1) March 1915: “De Kempenaar, Turnhout” (province of Antwerp)

The earliest source discovered until now is a message in the newspaper “De Kempenaar” with a description of the decoration of flour sacks with embroidery, needlework and lace. In ornate words, the decorated flour sacks gave the opportunity for a patriotic “cri-de-coeur” from a journalist in Turnhout, province of Antwerp, under the headline: “The Germans in De Kempen”:
“While all sorts of necessities are coming from the billion-dollar country to help the Belgian population in pressure and distress, our feminine side has sought and found a means of expressing deep gratitude to the Americans with as much fine tact as generosity.
And look at the sacks in which American flour is sent to us and some of which bear the name of the world-famous billionaire Rockefeller, they have displayed their art in beautiful needle and embroidery, on which they picture the maps of Belgium, the province of Antwerp, flowers and figures have been worked out and embroidered, sometimes trimmed with fine real Turnhout edges and which will soon elicit an exclamations of astonishment and admiration in the new world, yes maybe will be sold at the price of hundreds or thousands of dollars.
After all, is it a memento of that small but brave nation, of those heroic Belgians who have fulfilled their patriotic duty so honorably and gloriously? … Is it the work of the mothers, of the sisters of those admirable soldiers, who now want to send a small but meaningful memento with their own art and own manual labor to the protectors of our people and our nation that will be received and preserved there in the large families like the relic of a heroic people, fighting for their rights, their freedom and independence??…”.
(De Kempenaar, March 21, 1915)

2) March 1915: “La farine d’Amérique”

Photo of shop window in L’Actualité Illustrée, March 27, 1915

The second source is a photo in L’Actualité Illustrée of March 27, 1915. The photo with caption “La farine d’Amérique” (“The flour of America”) shows the shop window in which empty flour sacks are displayed. What does this photo reveal?
– the window of a bread bakery that advertises its “hygiène et propreté” and “pétrissage mécanique” (“hygiene and cleanliness” and “mechanical kneading”)
– the presentation of a series of empty flour sacks and many American flags, with a framed, perhaps embroidered flour sack in the center at the top.
All this as proof of the enthusiasm for the reception of the flour, the quality of the bread baked by it, the gratitude to “America” and a gesture of Belgian patriotism including indirect reproach to the German occupier.

3) April 1915: Diary “J. v. d. K”

Embroidery and framed pictures of the Belgian princess and princes by a schoolgirl from Anderlecht, Brussels, 1915. Fig. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, Iowa, USA.

The diary of “J.v.d.K.” is an interesting source about embroidery at school. In her diary the girl noted:
Le 26 avril -1915…Mère brode a ma place des sacs d’Am
Le 28 avril – 1915…A l’école nous brodons les sac de farine am… Rien de nouveau sous le soleil (chanson de ma jeunesse)…”(Lucien Karhausen, Le Cahier Perdu…p 103, 104)

Translation:
“April 26, 1915: … Mother embroiders Am sacks in my place…
April 28, 1915: … At school we embroider the am flour sacks … Nothing new under the sun (song of my youth) …”.
The girls were embroidering at (sewing) schools. They must have been bored at times, perhaps this is why this girl’s mother had put in the stitches for her. As the embroidery was performed as part of their education, the girls received no remuneration for their work.

De Belgische Standaard, May 7, 1915

4) May 1915: A letter from Opwijck (province of Flemish Brabant)
“OPWIJCK. From a few letters….
We are still well supplied with food: America takes care of everything. Long live America! We get wholemeal flour and flour every week and if we use a bit of farm flour, we eat the tastiest bread; …
We now show our gratitude to our benefactors, embroider empty flour sacks with tricolor drawings and inscription: “The grateful Opwijck to the United States”, and others. I make a ”milieu-de-table” and so everyone contributes something.
This is how people work in all villages and it seems that our work is being sold for dollars to the billionaires who want souvenirs of deeply ravaged Belgium. The proceeds are for us...”
(De Belgische Standaard (The Belgian Standard), May 7th, 1915).

5) May 1915: “Sale of American sacks”, Brussels

Het Vlaamsche Nieuws, Saturday May 29, 1915

There were reports in the newspaper about the sale of empty flour sacks.
“Sale of American sacks. – The sacks in which the flour of America comes to us have been sold for some time to the benefit of the “Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation”. The sales take place on Avenue Anspach (Brussels), in the offices where the Red Star Line used to be located. The first sales days gave a result which no one expected. The sacks were then handed over to young girls who manufacture all kinds of very beautiful things from them, all kinds of war souvenirs or expressions of gratitude towards generous America that sent us those sacks filled with the flour that saved us from famine.” Het Vlaamsche Nieuws (Flemish News), May 29th, 1915)

KBR: Postcard online
The shop window of the Red Star Line in ”l’Avenue Anspach”, Brussels. Fig. Exhibition War & Food, Evere, 2016

A postcard in the collection of the Royal Library of Belgium (KBR) in Brussels shows the window of said building on the Avenue Anspach.

This image was on display at the “Food & War” exhibition “A culinary history of the Great War” in Brussels Museum of the Mill and Food in Evere from October 2015-August 2016. When the photo was taken is not mentioned, my estimate would be summer 1915. The shop window is filled with decorated flour sacks: “Sacs de farine Américains brodés et transformés vendus au Profit des Orphelins de la Guerre. (Embroidered and processed American flour sacks sold for the benefit of War Orphans) Marcovici editor, Bruxelles, 27, Av. Stephanie.” The head of the saleswoman is visible in the center of the image, next to the flour sack “Washington Flour”.

6) August 1915: Tribute book Ghent
The 1915 Tribute book of the city of Ghent expressed gratitude to a local committee of ladies with the following text:
Secours Discret, Section D: Aide et protection aux brodeuses (Œuvres des Sacs Américains). Cette section dont s’occupent spécialement:
Mesdames Baronne de Crombrugge, J. Feyerick, E. de Hemptinne, Vande Putte.
A pris l’initiative de transformer en coussins brodés et autres ouvrages artistiques, les sacs à farine (aux marques de fabriques originales) reçus de l’Amérique.
Son siège est situé Marché aux Oiseaux, dans les magasins de M. Robert, mis gracieusement à la disposition de la section.
La vente se fait au profit du Comité Provincial de Secours et l’entreprise assure un salaire à un certain nombre d’ouvrières.”[1]

Translation:
(“Discrete Aid, Section D: Aid and Protection for Embroiderers (Work of American Sacks). This committee, which consists in particular of:
The ladies Baronne de Crombrugge, J. Feyerick, E. de Hemptinne, Vande Putte,
took the initiative to transform the flour sacks (with the marks of original factories) received from America into embroidered cushions and other artistic works.
Its headquarters are located at Marché aux Oiseaux, in Mr. Robert’s stores, which are made available to the section free of charge.
The sale is for the benefit of the Provincial Committee of Relief and the committee provides a salary to a certain number of workers.”)

Decorated flour sack, embroidered in Ghent, 1915. Collection and image: Frankie van Rossem

7) November 1915: “Nice memories, very useful as a gift”, Ghent

The Ghent committee thus identified working on flour sacks as providing employment to unemployed embroiderers and creating sales for charities such as those benefiting orphans and other war victims. Making objects to serve as Saint Nicolas (a local holiday akin to Christmas) gifts turned out to be important! Making gifts for American relief workers was not the aim … In November 1915 we read this announcement in several newspapers:

“The committee of American flour sacks has decided, with the prospect of St. Nicholas gifts, to sell a whole new series, beautifully embroidered sacks and a multitude of items made by means of sacks originating from the United States. Each of these items carries an American factory brand, artfully embroidered! A They are nice memories, very useful as a gift; what is more, the purchase of each of these objects is good work since the proceeds of the sale serve to provide for the maintenance of numerous workers and to increase the income of the “Work of the War Orphans. The sale will start on November 30.” (De Gentenaar. De landwacht, De kleine patriot. (The Land Guard, The Little Patriot, November 17, 1915)) [2]

Conclusion

Photo collage from the delivery of flour to the distribution of bread. Photo SA Phototypie Belge, Collection In Flanders Fields Museum, Ypres

Belgian women have taken the initiative with their commercial spirit to transform empty flour sacks into decorated flour sacks. In the spirit of North American donations, the flour sacks have indeed been reused, but in a surprisingly inventive manner. The approach of the Americans: “utility and thrift” – reusing flour sacks for making underwear and towels – has been deviated from due to Belgian generosity and the desire to create beauty, to make goods that people would like to buy as gifts and souvenirs.

Photo in the magazine “Le Temps Présent”, March 31, 1915

Even empty and unprocessed, the flour sacks with logos from American and Canadian flour mills and texts from the donating people were so beautiful that they formed an attractive souvenir. Together with beautiful cushions, tea cozies, hangers, table runners, sacks decorated with colorful embroidery, elegant needlework and lace, the flour sacks generously filled the Belgian shop windows, sales exhibitions and raffles.

The proceeds were intended for charity. The two underlying motifs for the Belgian inhabitants were
– to provide employment and
– to raise money through sales to help war victims.
Donating the decorated flour sacks as souvenirs, memories of the war, and out of gratitude for food relief was the selling point, it contributed to getting financial support from the wealthy circles in Belgium and the “billionaires” in America.

 

[1] Ville de Gand, Œuvres de Philanthropie…1915,  p. 73, 74
[2] Four newspapers: De Gentenaar. De landwacht. De kleine patriot; Het Volk. Christen Werkmansblad; Vooruit. Socialistisch Dagblad; Journal de Gand, all published November 17th, 1915

Transformatie van Meelzakken met borduur-, naald- en kantwerk

Mijn doelstelling van onderzoek is onder meer de mythische geschiedenis van het ontstaan van de Versierde Meelzakken in WOI te ontwarren.
Versierde Meelzakken in WOI zijn zowel geborduurd, bewerkt met naaldwerk en versierd met kant, als beschilderd door kunstenaars. Er zijn Meelzakken getransformeerd tot kleding.
Wie hebben het idee gehad om de zakken her te gebruiken en waar en wanneer is dat begonnen? Was het een Belgisch initiatief of gebeurde het op Amerikaanse suggestie?
Voor het vinden van antwoorden op mijn vragen heb ik systematisch een aantal Belgische kranten en geïllustreerde tijdschriften van eind 1914, begin 1915 doorgespit, Deze pers is gedigitaliseerd en staat online. Enkele Amerikaanse publicaties had ik al eerder gevonden en combineer ik met de informatie uit België. Mijn eerste blog in de reeks handelt over hergebruik van meelzakken tot kleding.

Versierde Meelzak, geborduurd door Germaine Joly, Ecole Moyenne, Saint-Gilles, Bruxelles. Afb. ‘From Aid tot Art’, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987, collectie Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University, V.S.

Dit tweede blog bespreekt de:

Transformatie van meelzakken met borduur-, naald- en kantwerk tot Versierde Meelzakken. Belgische bronnen 1915

Hieronder volgen zeven Belgische primaire bronnen uit 1915 over het ontstaan van deze Versierde Meelzakken.

1) Maart 1915: De Kempenaar, Turnhout


Tot heden heb ik in de krant ‘De Kempenaar’ de vroegste bron gevonden met een beschrijving van het versieren van de meelzakken met borduur-, naald- en kantwerk. In bloemrijke woorden gaven de Versierde Meelzakken gelegenheid tot een patriottische ‘cri-de-coeur’ van een journalist in Turnhout, provincie Antwerpen onder de kop: ‘De Duitschers in De Kempen’:
Terwijl ons uit het miljardenland allerlei benodigdheden toekomen om de in druk en nood verkeerende belgische bevolking te helpen, heeft ons vrouwelijk element met zoveel fijnen tact als edelmoedig gevoel een middel gezocht en gevonden om de Amerikanen een blijk te geven van innige dankbaarheid.
En zie op de zakjes waarin ons het Amerikaansch meel wordt toegezonden en waarvan sommige den naam dragen van den wereldberoemden milliardair Rockefeller hebben zij hun kunst uitgespreid in prachtig naald- en borduurwerk, waarop zij de landkaarten van België, van de provincie Antwerpen, bloemen en figuren hebben uitgewerkt en geborduurd, soms met fijne echte Turnhoutse kanten afgezet en welke straks in de nieuwe wereld een uitroep van verbazing en bewondering zullen uitlokken, ja misschein aan den prijs van honderden of duizenden dollars zullen worden verkocht. ’t Is immers een aandenken van dat kleine maar dappere volk, van die heldhaftige Belgen, die zoo eer- en roemvol hunnen vaderlandse plicht hebben vervuld?… ’t Is het werk van de moeders, van de zusters dier bewonderenswaardige soldaten, die nu met eigen kunst en eigen handenarbeid de beschermers van ons volk en onzer natie een klein maar veelbeteekenend aandenken willen zenden dat ginds in de groote familiën als de reliquie van een heldenvolk, dat strijdt voor zijn recht, zijne vrijheid en onafhankelijkheid, zal ontvangen en bewaard worden??… (De Kempenaar, 21 maart 1915)

2) Maart 1915: ‘La farine d’Amérique’

Foto van winkeletalage in L’Actualité Illustrée, 27 maart 1915

Het tweede bericht is een foto in L’Actualité Illustrée van 27 maart 1915. De foto met onderschrift ‘La farine d’Amérique’ (‘Het meel van Amerika’) toont de etalage van een winkel, waarin Meelzakken zijn uitgestald. Wat zie ik op deze foto?
– de etalage van een broodbakkerij die reclame maakt voor zijn ‘hygiène et propreté’ en ‘pétrissage mécanique’ (‘hygiene en zindelijkheid’ en ‘mechanisch kneden’)
– de presentatie van een serie lege Meelzakken en vele Amerikaanse vlaggetjes, met centraal bovenin waarschijnlijk een ingelijste, misschien wel een geborduurde Meelzak.
Dit alles als bewijs van enthousiasme voor de ontvangst van het meel, de kwaliteit van het daarmee gebakken brood door deze bakker, de dankbaarheid aan ‘Amerika’ en een gebaar van Belgisch patriottisme inclusief indirect verwijt aan de Duitse bezetter.

3) April 1915: Dagboek ‘J. v. d. K’

Schilderijtje/fotolijstje geborduurd door schoolmeisje uit Anderlecht, Brussel, 1915. Afb. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, Iowa, V.S.

Het dagboek van ‘J.v.d.K.’ is een interessante bron over het borduren op school. In haar dagboek noteerde het meisje:
“Le 26 avril -1915…Mère brode a ma place des sacs d’Am
Le 28 avril – 1915…A l’école nous brodons les sac de farine am… Rien de nouveau sous le soleil (chanson de ma jeunesse)…'(Lucien Karhausen, Le Cahier Perdu…p 103, 104)

Vertaling:
“26 april 1915…Moeder borduurt in mijn plaats ‘Am’ zakken
28 april 1915…Op school borduren we de ‘Am’ meelzakken… Niets nieuws onder de zon (lied uit mijn jeugd)…’

Op (naai)scholen waren de meisjes aan het borduren gezet. Enige verveling zal hen niet vreemd zijn geweest…Omdat het borduren in onderwijsvorm plaats vond, ontvingen de meisjes geen vergoeding voor hun werk.

De Belgische Standaard, 7 mei 1915

4) Mei 1915: Een brief in De Belgische Standaard
‘OPWIJCK. Uit een paar brieven. ………….
Wij zijn nog altijd goed voorzien van eetwaren: Amerika zorgt voor alles. Leve Amerika! We krijgen meel en dons alle weken en als men daarbij wat boeremeel gebruikt, eet men allersmakelijkst brood; … Wij nu om onze dankbaarheid aan onze weldoeners te betoonen, borduren ledige meelzakjes met driekleurige teekeningen en als opschrift: «Het dankbaar Opwijck aan de Vereenigde Staten», en andere. Ik maak een milieu de table en zoo brengt ieder iets bij. Zoo werkt men in alle dorpen en ’t schijnt dat ons werk dollars verkocht wordt aan de milliardairen die gedenkenissen willen van het diep geteisterde België. De opbrengst is voor ons. ………...’ (De Belgische Standaard, 7 mei 1915).

5) Mei 1915: ‘Verkoop van Amerikaansche Zakken’

Het Vlaamsche Nieuws, zaterdag 29 mei 1915

Er verschenen berichten in de krant over de verkoop van lege Meelzakken.
‘Verkoop van Amerikaansche Zakken. – De zakken waarin de bloem van Amerika ons toekomt, werden sedert eenigen tijd verkocht ten voordeele van het Voedingskomiteit. De verkoop heeft plaats op de Anspachlaan (Brussel), in de bureelen waar vroeger de Red Star Line gevestigd was. De eerste verkoopdagen gaven een uitslag waar geen mensch zich verwachtte. De zakken werden dan overgeleverd aan jonge meisjes die er allerlei heel schoone zaken uit vervaardigen, allerlei herinneringen aan den oorlog of uitingen van dankbaarheid jegens het edelmoedige Amerika dat ons die zakken zond, gevuld met de bloem die ons van den hongersnood bevrijdde.’ (Het Vlaamsche Nieuws, 29 mei 1915)

KBR: Ansichtkaart online

Een ansichtkaart, onderdeel van de collectie van de Koninklijke Bibliotheek in Brussel (KBR) toont een foto van de etalage van het genoemde pand aan de Anspachlaan. De foto was te zien op de tentoonstelling ‘Food & War.

De etalage van de Red Star Line in de Anspachlaan, Brussel. Afb. Expositie War & Food, Evere, 2016

Een culinaire geschiedenis van de Groote Oorlog.’ in Brussels Museum van de Molen en de Voeding te Evere van oktober 2015-augustus 2016. Wanneer de foto is gemaakt is onvermeld, mijn inschatting zou zijn voorjaar/zomer 1915. De etalage is gevuld met Versierde Meelzakken: ‘Sacs de farine Américains brodés et transformés vendus au Profit des Orphelins de la Guerre. Marcovici éditeur, Bruxelles, 27, Av. Stéphanie’. Op de foto is middenbovenin, rechts naast de meelzak ‘Washington Flour’ het hoofd te zien van een verkoopster in de winkel.

6) Augustus 1915: Huldeboek Gent


Het Huldeboek van de stad Gent bedankt in 1915 het plaatselijke comité van dames met de volgende tekst: “Secours Discret, Section D: Aide et protection aux brodeuses (Œuvres des Sacs Américains). Cette section dont s’occupent spécialement:
Mesdames Baronne de Crombrugge, J. Feyerick, E. de Hemptinne, Vande Putte.
A pris l’initiative de transformer en coussins brodés et autres ouvrages artistiques, les sacs à farine (aux marques de fabriques originales) reçus de l’Amérique.
Son siège est situé Marché aux Oiseaux, dans les magasins de M. Robert, mis gracieusement à la disposition de la section.
La vente se fait au profit du Comité Provincial de Secours et l’entreprise assure un salaire à un certain nombre d’ouvrières.’[1]

Vertaling:
‘Discrete Hulp, sectie D: Hulp en werkgelegenheid voor borduursters (Werken van de Amerikaanse Zakken). Deze sectie, waar de volgende dames zich speciaal mee bezig houden: de dames Baronne de Crombrugge, J. Feyerick, E. de Hemptinne, Vande Putte heeft het initiatief genomen om geborduurde kussens en andere artistieke werkstukken te maken van de uit Amerika ontvangen meelzakken (met oorspronkelijke merknamen van de meelfabrieken). Het komiteit is gevestigd ‘Marché aux Oiseaux’ in de winkel/magazijnen van meneer Robert, die kosteloos ter beschikking zijn gesteld. De verkoop komt ten goede aan het Provinciale Hulpkomiteit en de onderneming verschaft loon aan een aantal arbeidsters.’

Versierde Meelzak, geborduurd in Gent, 1915. Collectie en afb. Frankie van Rossem

 

7) November 1915: ‘Aardige herinneringen, zeer dienstig als geschenk’


Het komiteit in Gent duidde het werken aan de meelzakken dus aan als werkgelegenheid scheppen voor werkloze borduursters en verkopen voor het goede doel zoals wezen en andere oorlogsslachtoffers. Voorwerpen maken om te dienen als Sinterklaasgeschenken bleek belangrijk! Cadeau’s maken voor de Amerikaanse hulpverleners was niet het doel… In november 1915 lezen we deze mededeling in meerdere kranten:

 

‘Amerikaansche zakken .- Het komiteit der Amerikaansche zakjes, heeft besloten in het vooruitzicht der St. Niklaasgeschenken, over te gaan tot den verkoop van eene gansche nieuwe reeks, prachtig geborduurde zakjes alsook van eene menigte voorwerpen vervaardigd bij middel van zakken, voortkomende van de Vereenigde Staten. Elk dezer voorwerpen draagt een Amerikaansch fabriekmerk, op kunstige wijze geborduurd! ’t Zijn aardige herinneringen, zeer dienstig als geschenk; wat meer is de aankoop van elk dezer voorwerpen is een goed werk aangezien de opbrengst van den verkoop dient om in het onderhoud te voorzien van talrijke werksters en om de inkomsten van het «Werk der Oorlogswezen» te vermeerderen. … De verkoop zal op 30 November aanvangen.’ (De Gentenaar. De landwacht, De kleine patriot, 17 november 1915) [2]

Conclusie

Foto collage van de aanvoer van meel tot uitdelen van het brood. Afb. uit expositie ‘Remembering Herbert Hoover and the Commission for Relief in Belgium’, In Flanders Fields Museum, Ieper, 2013

Belgische vrouwen hebben met hun handelsgeest doortastend het initiatief genomen om lege meelzakken te transformeren tot ‘Versierde Meelzakken’. In de geest van de Amerikaanse hulpverleners zijn de meelzakken inderdaad herbruikt, maar op een verrassend inventieve wijze. De utilitaire en zuinige benadering van de Amerikanen -herbruik de meelzakken voor het maken van ondergoed en handdoeken- is doorbroken door de Belgische vrijgevigheid en de wens om schoonheid te scheppen, artikelen te maken die de mensen graag zouden ontvangen als cadeaus en souvenirs.

Foto in het tijdschrift ‘Le Temps Présent’, 31 maart 1915

Zelfs leeg en onbewerkt waren de meelzakken met logo’s van de meelfabrieken en teksten van de hulpbrengers al zo mooi, dat ze een aantrekkelijk souvenir vormden. Samen met fraaie kussens, theemutsen, hangers, tafellopers, tasjes versierd met kleurrijk borduurwerk, sierlijk naald- en kantwerk, vulden de Meelzakken royaal de Belgische winkeletalages, verkooptentoonstellingen en tombola’s.
De opbrengst was bestemd voor het goede doel. De twee achterliggende drijfveren voor de Belgische bevolking waren
– het scheppen van werkgelegenheid en
– door verkoop geld inzamelen voor hulp aan oorlogsslachtoffers.

Cadeau doen van de Versierde Meelzakken als souvenirs, herinneringen aan de oorlog, en uit dankbaarheid voor de voedselhulp was het verkoopargument, het droeg bij aan het verkrijgen van financiële steun van welgestelden in België en de ‘milliardairs’ in Amerika.

 

[1] Ville de Gand, Œuvres de Philanthropie…1915,  blz. 73, 74
[2] Vier kranten: De Gentenaar. De landwacht. De kleine patriot; Het Volk. Christen Werkmansblad; Vooruit. Socialistisch Dagblad; Journal de Gand, alle gepubliceerd op 17 november 1915

Reusing Flour Bags as Clothing

Decorated flour sack from flour factory in Buffalo, NY, with embroidery and needlework “Merci aux Américains” by “École Morichar de Saint-Gilles”, 1915; Fig. “From Aid to Art”, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987, Hoover Institution Library & Archives Collection, Stanford University, USA.

One of the goals of my research is to unravel the mythical history of the origins of the decorated Flour Bags in WWI. Decorated Flour Bags in WWI can be both embroidered, decorated with needlework and with lace, as well as painted on by artists. Flour Bags have been transformed into clothing.

Who had the idea of reusing these bags and where and when did that start? Was it a Belgian initiative or did it happen due to American suggestion?

Belgian newspapers and magazines
To find answers to my questions, I systematically went through a number of Belgian newspapers and illustrated magazines from the end of 1914, beginning of 1915; these have been digitized and are online.

I had already found some American publications before and combined them with the information from Belgium.

Color photo in “1914 ILLUSTRÉ, no. 22, February 1915”: Flour arrives in Brussels

I have split my analysis and findings into four parts:

  1. Reuse of Flour Bags into clothing.
  2. Transformation of Flour Bags with embroidery, needlework and lace into decorated Flour Bags, Belgian primary sources.
  3. Transformation of Flour Bags into painted decorated Flour Bags, Belgian primary sources.
  4. Transformation of Flour Bags into decorated Flour Bags, American primary sources.

Reusing Flour Bags as clothing
In this blog I will discuss the origin of the reuse of Flour Bags as clothing. Two primary sources, one Belgian from early 1915 and one American from late 1914, bear witness to this.

1) January 1915: Madame Vandervelde

Madame Vandervelde; Fig. gw.geneanet.org

The earliest Belgian source with information that I have found so far is an article about Madame Vandervelde. Her maiden name was Charlotte ‘Lalla’ Speyer, British by birth but from German parents, she was married in 1901 to her second husband, the Belgian Minister of State, Emile Vandervelde. The couple divorced immediately after WWI. [1]

Article in “Le XXe siècle: journal d’union et d’action catholique” of January 16, 1915

Since October 1914, Madame Vandervelde had been in the United States to ask for help for the Belgian population in need. In Buffalo, New York, she gave a lecture and received 10,000 bags of flour as a gift. The bags were made of fine cotton and intended for reuse.

La propagande pro-belge aux États-Unis.
‘Madame Vandervelde, la femme du Ministre d’Etat, est aux
États-Unis depuis plus de trois mois. Elle y a donné et y donne sur la Belgique et les horreurs, dont elle a été victime, une série de conférences qui ont le plus grand succès et dans lesquelles on acclame la Belgique et les Belges. …..
A Buffalo, des industriels lui ont offert un bâteau chargé de 10.000 sacs de farine, – sacs confectionnés en fine toile et en étoffe, afin qu’ils puissent servir par la suite et être transformés en vêtements et en linges pour les habitants. …

Translation: “In Buffalo, manufacturers have donated to her a ship with 10,000 bags of flour – bags made of fine canvas and cloth, so that these can afterwards be used and transformed into clothing and towels for the inhabitants…. “

Madame Vandervelde had apparently set up her own relief fund, the ‘Madame Vandervelde Fund’, to house all the donations she received in the United States. I have deduced this from:

Unprocessed flour sack Madame Vandervelde Fund.  Image: Imprimerie Société Anonyme Belge de Phototypie (Collection IFFM)

a) the unprocessed Flour Bag on a photo of a Flour Bags-collage, provided to me by the In Flanders Fields Museum (IFFM), Ypres, with the text: “War Relief Donation Flour from Madame Vandervelde Fund – Belgian Relief Fund, Buffalo, N.Y. U.S.A. 49 Lbs.”[2]

Decorated flour sack “Madame Vandervelde Fund”, collection IFFM, Ypres

 

 

b) the decorated Flour Bag, which I see online at the ‘Ieperse Collecties’ (Ypres Collections). Object number IFF 003008 is an “Embroidered and painted Flour Bag attached on a stretcher with the text “War Relief Donation – Flour 1914-1915 – from Madame Vandervelde Fund “. At the top the portrait of Emile Vandervelde, Minister of State of Belgium.”

 

2) November 1914: Mr. William C. Edgar

The earliest American source on the reuse of Flour Bags as clothing comes from Mr. William C. Edgar, editor-in-chief of the American newspaper “The Northwestern Miller” in Minneapolis, Minnesota. On November 4, 1914, he started the aid campaign “The Miller’s Relief Movement”. [3] The newspaper, a trade magazine for grain millers, made a request to subscribers and advertisers, in particular the flour mills, to donate flour for Belgium’s aid. The quality of the flour was specified in detail and the packaging had to meet the following conditions: cotton bags, sturdy for transport, dimensions suitable for handling by one person and last but not least “suitable for reuse“:

Instructions were issued at the same time for packing the flour. These stipulated that a strong forty-nine pound cotton sack be used. This was for three reasons: the size of the package would be convenient for individual handling in the ultimate distribution; the use of cotton would, to a certain extent, help the then depressed cotton market, and finally and most important, after the flour was eaten, the empty cotton sack could be used by the housewife for an undergarment, the package thus providing both food and clothing. ‘(Final Report: The Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement 1914-1915, p. 9). [4]

Tradition

Undergarment made from Flour Bag. Fig.: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum, Iowa, USA

The motive for reuse was widely used among the American female population. Reuse of cotton bags had already been established for decades and earlier. Cotton was a product of the country, bags were usable pieces of cotton. It provided the sparing housewife with simple items of clothing for free or for a low price. After good washing, the seamstresses cut the pattern of the clothes out of the bags and mainly made undergarments for their own family. After the First World War, the reuse of cotton bags developed further in the US from the 1920s.

Lou Hoover poses in a cotton evening gown to encourage women to wear cotton clothing, in particular evening gowns (around 1930); Fig. firstladies.org

During the depression in the 1930s, the Americans protected their distressed cotton industry, reusing cotton bags was a sign of frugality and also a patriotic duty. Product development and marketing efforts by bag suppliers resulted in washable prints, washable labels and finally colorful, fashionable and hip prints on the bags. In the 40s and 50s it was particularly fashionable to wear garments made from bags. A true “Feedsack” cult prevailed among rural women to sew clothes from used cotton bags that had served as packages of chicken feed, flour, sugar and rice for the entire family. [5]

Photo in ‘L’ événement Illustré: L’Ouvroir des Dames Namuroises’, April 1915, no. 9
Jacket made from Flour Bag. Fig.: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum, Iowa, USA

The reuse of flour bags into clothing would have been taken up by Belgian women’s organizations under the protection of the Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation, as soon as the relief work had properly started in January 1915.

It was typical of Belgian women that they not only made undergarments from the flour bags, but also cute, happy dresses for their children. In Heverlee, 80 children, mostly girls from around 4 to 6 years old, were photographed, dressed in Flour Sacks with the “American Commission” logo.

Image in Europeana Collections (estimated 1915)

Mr. Robert Bruyninckx shared this black and white photo of 14 × 9 cm in the Europeana Collections under the title: “Group photo with children dressed in clothes made from bags of the American Commission for Relief in Belgium.”

Description: “Group photo with Jeanne Caterine Charleer (born in Heverlee on August 17, 1910), top row, 7th from the right. Children dressed in clothes made from bags of the American Commission for Relief, with the American flag in the background. The photo is a family piece. Jeanne Caterine Charleer was the mother of Robert Bruyninckx.”[6]

Girl in Flour Bag dress from California. Fig.: Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University, V.S.

A girl in New York was photographed in a “Belgian” dress with the “Sperry Flour” logo from California.

Conclusion

Although I have only found two primary sources to date, I nevertheless come to a provisional conclusion about the origin of the reuse of Flour Bags as clothing: this practice was taken up in Belgium at the suggestion of American relief workers. The Belgian women found the Flour Bags so special, they made, apart from undergarments, also nice dresses for their children.

 

[1] Gubin, Eliane, Dictionnaire des femmes belges: XIXe et XXe siècle, p. 510-512; gw.geneanet.org: “Charlotte Hélène Frédérique Marie Speyer”

[2] Delmarcel, Guy, Pride of Niagara. Best Winter Wheat. Amerikaanse Meelzakken als textiele getuigen van Wereldoorlog I. Brussel, Jubelpark: Bulletin van de Koninklijke Musea voor Kunst en Geschiedenis (‘American flour sacks as textile witnesses of World War I’. Brussels, Cinquantenaire: Bulletin of the Royal Museums of Art and History), deel 84, 2013, p. 97-126

[3] See also my blog: “A Celebrity Flemish Flour Bag in The Land of Nevele” of October 25, 2018

[4] The Millers ’Belgian Relief Movement 1914-15 conducted by The Northwestern Miller. Final Report of its Director William C. Edgar, Editor of the Northwestern Miller, MCMXV

[5] Three sources to continue reading about ‘Feed Sacks’:
Linzee Kull McCray, Feed Sacks, The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric, 2016/2019;
– Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood, 
For a few sacks more, online exhibition Textile Research Centre, Leiden, 2018
– Marian Ann J. Montgomery, 
Cotton and Thrift. Feed Sacks and the Fabric of American Households, 2019

[6] The group photo with the children in Heverlee in clothing from bags with the logo ‘American Commission’ is printed in the article by Ina Ruckebusch: ‘Belgische voedselschaarste en Amerikaanse voedselhulp tijdens WOI’ in: Patakon, tijdschrift voor bakerfgoed, (Belgian food scarcity and American food aid during WWI’ in: Patakon, Magazine about bakery heritage) 5 nr. 1 (2014) , p. 29.

 

Hergebruik van Meelzakken tot kleding

Versierde Meelzak van meelfabriek in Buffalo, NY,  met borduur- en naaldwerk ‘Merci aux Américains’ door ‘École Morichar de Saint-Gilles’, 1915; Afb. ‘From Aid tot Art’, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987, collectie Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University, V.S.

Mijn doelstelling van onderzoek is onder meer de mythische geschiedenis van het ontstaan van de Versierde Meelzakken in WOI te ontwarren.
Versierde Meelzakken in WOI zijn zowel geborduurd, bewerkt met naaldwerk en versierd met kant, als beschilderd door kunstenaars. Er zijn Meelzakken getransformeerd tot kleding.
Wie hebben het idee gehad om de zakken her te gebruiken en waar en wanneer is dat begonnen? Was het een Belgisch initiatief of gebeurde het op Amerikaanse suggestie?

 

Belgische kranten en tijdschriften
Voor het vinden van antwoorden op mijn vragen heb ik systematisch een aantal Belgische kranten en geïllustreerde tijdschriften van eind 1914, begin 1915 doorgespit, Deze pers is gedigitaliseerd en staat online.
Enkele Amerikaanse publicaties had ik al eerder gevonden en combineer ik met de informatie uit België.

Kleurenfoto in ‘1914 ILLUSTRE, no 22, februari 1915’: Meel komt aan in Brussel

Ik heb mijn analyse en bevindingen uitgesplitst in vier delen:

  1. Hergebruik van meelzakken tot kleding, zie dit blog 24 mei 2019.
  2. Transformatie van meelzakken met borduur-, naald- en kantwerk tot Versierde Meelzakken, Belgische primaire bronnen, zie blog 26 mei 2019.
  3. Transformatie van meelzakken tot beschilderde Versierde Meelzakken, Belgische primaire bronnen.
  4. Transformatie van meelzakken tot Versierde Meelzakken, Amerikaanse primaire bronnen.

Hergebruik van Meelzakken tot kleding
In dit blog zal ik ingaan op het ontstaan van het hergebruik van Meelzakken tot kleding. Twee primaire bronnen, een Belgische uit begin 1915 en een Amerikaanse uit eind 1914, getuigen ervan.

Madame Vandervelde; Afb. gw.geneanet.org

1) Januari 1915: Madame Vandervelde
De vroegste Belgische bron met informatie die ik tot heden heb gevonden is een artikeltje over Madame Vandervelde. Haar meisjesnaam was Charlotte ‘Lalla’ Speyer, van geboorte Britse uit Duitse ouders, ze was in 1901 getrouwd met haar tweede echtgenoot, de Belgische Minister van Staat, Emile Vandervelde. Het paar scheidde direct na WOI. [1]

Artikel in ‘Le XXe siecle: journal d’union et d’action catholique’ van 16 januari 1915

Sinds oktober 1914 verbleef Madame Vandervelde in de Verenigde Staten om hulp te vragen voor de Belgische bevolking in nood. In Buffalo, New York, hield ze een lezing en kreeg zakken meel als geschenk. De zakken waren van fijne katoen en bedoeld voor hergebruik.

La propagande pro-belge aux Etats-Unis.
‘Madame Vandervelde, la femme du Ministre d’Etat, est aux Etas-Unis depuis plus de trois mois. Elle y a donné et y donne sur la Belgique et les horreurs, dont elle a été victime, une série de conférences qui ont le plus grand succès et dans lesquelles on acclame la Belgique et les Belges. …..
A Buffalo, des industriels lui ont offert un bâteau chargé de 10.000 sacs de farine, – sacs confectionnés en fine toile et en étoffe, afin qu’ils puissent servir par la suite et être transformés en vêtements et en linges pour les habitants. … ‘.

Vertaling:
‘In Buffalo hebben industriëlen haar een schip geladen met 10.000 zakken meel geschonken – zakken gemaakt van fijn doek en van fijne stof, zodat deze vervolgens gebruikt kunnen worden en getransformeerd tot kleding en handdoeken voor de mensen.’

Madame Vandervelde had kennelijk een fonds opgericht om de donaties die zij in de Verenigde Staten ontving, in onder te brengen. Ik maak dit op uit:

Onbewerkte Meelzak Madame Vandervelde Fund. Foto: Imprimerie Société Anonyme Belge de Phototypie (Collectie. IFFM)

a) de onbewerkte Meelzak op een foto van een collage meelzakken, aan mij verstrekt door het In Flanders Fields Museum (IFFM), Ieper, met de tekst: ‘War Relief Donation Flour from Madame Vandervelde Fund – Belgian Relief Fund, Buffalo, N.Y. U.S.A. 49 Lbs.’ Het Museum Kunst & Geschiedenis in Brussel heeft een dergelijke meelzak in de collectie. [2]

Versierde Meelzak ‘Madame Vandervelde Fund’, collectie IFFM

 

 

b) de Versierde Meelzak, die ik online zie staan bij de Ieperse collecties. Objectnummer IFF 003008 is een ‘Geborduurde en beschilderde meelzak opgespannen op een spieraam met o.a. de tekst “War Relief Donation – Flour 1914-1915 – from Madame Vandervelde Fund”. Bovenaan het portret van Emiel Vandervelde, minister van staat van België.’

 

2) November 1914: Mr. William C. Edgar
De vroegste Amerikaanse bron over hergebruik van meelzakken tot kleding komt van Mr. William C. Edgar, hoofdredacteur van de Amerikaanse krant de ‘The Northwestern Miller’ in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Hij startte op 4 november 1914 de hulpactie ‘The Miller’s Relief Movement’. [3] De krant, een vakblad voor molenaars en maalderijen van graan, deed het verzoek aan abonnees en adverteerders om bloem te schenken voor België. De kwaliteit van het meel was in detail gespecificeerd en ook de verpakking moest aan voorwaarden voldoen: katoenen zakken, stevig voor transport, afmeting geschikt voor handling door één persoon én last but not least ‘geschikt voor hergebruik’:

‘Instructions were issued at the same time for packing the flour. These stipulated that a strong forty-nine pound cotton sack be used. This was for three reasons: the size of the package would be convenient for individual handling in the ultimate distribution; the use of cotton would, to a certain extent, help the then depressed cotton market, and finally and most important, after the flour was eaten, the empty cotton sack could be used by the housewife for an undergarment, the package thus providing both food and clothing.’ (Final Report The Miller’s Belgian Relief Movement 1914-1915, blz. 9). [4]

Vertaling:
‘Tegelijkertijd werden instructies gegeven voor het verpakken van het meel. ….
… en als laatste en belangrijkste, nadat het meel was gegeten, kon de lege katoenen zak door de huisvrouw worden gebruikt om onderkleding van te maken, zodat de gevulde zak zowel voedsel als kleding verschafte.’

Traditie

Onderkleding van Meelzak. Afb. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum, Iowa, VS.

Het motief van hergebruik leefde breed onder de Amerikaanse vrouwelijke bevolking. Hergebruik van katoenen zakken was al tientallen jaren en ook eerder, ingeburgerd. Katoen was een product van het land, zakken waren bruikbare lappen katoen. Het leverde de spaarzame huisvrouw eenvoudige kledingstukken en dat gratis of voor een lage prijs. Na goed wassen knipten de naaisters het patroon van de kleding uit de zakken en confectioneerden voornamelijk onderkleding voor het eigen gezin. Na de Eerste Wereldoorlog, vanaf de jaren ’20 ontwikkelde het hergebruik van katoenen zakken zich verder in de VS.

Lou Hoover poseert in avondjurk van katoen om vrouwen te stimuleren katoenen kleding, in het bijzonder avondjaponnen, te dragen (rond 1930); Afb. firstladies.org

Tijdens de depressie in de jaren 1930 beschermden de Amerikanen hun noodlijdende katoenindustrie, hergebruik van katoenen zakken was een teken van zuinigheid en ook een patriottische plicht. Door productontwikkeling en inzet van marketing door de zakkenleveranciers, ontstonden uitwasbare bedrukkingen, afwasbare etiketten en tenslotte kleurrijke, modische en hippe prints op de zakken. In de jaren ’40 en ’50 was het bijzonder modieus om kledingstukken te dragen, gemaakt van zakken. Er heerste een ware ‘Feedsack’-cultus onder plattelandsvrouwen om voor de hele familie kleding te naaien van gebruikte katoenen zakken die hadden gediend als verpakkingen van kippenvoer, bloem, suiker en rijst. [5]

Foto in ‘L’événement Illustré: L’Ouvroir des Dames Namuroises’, april 1915, no. 9
Jasje van Meelzak. Afb. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum, Iowa, VS

Het hergebruik van de meelzakken tot kleding zal ter hand zijn genomen door Belgische vrouwenorganisaties onder bescherming van het Nationaal Hulp- en Voedingskomiteit, zodra de hulpverlening goed op gang was gekomen in januari 1915.

Het was tekenend voor de Belgische vrouwen dat ze niet alleen onderkleding hebben gemaakt van de meelzakken, maar ook schattige, blije jurkjes voor hun kinderen. In Heverlee gingen 80 kinderen, meest meisjes van ongeveer 4 tot 6 jaar oud, op de foto, gekleed in jurkjes van meelzakken met het logo ‘American Commission’.

Foto in Europeana Collections

De heer Robert Bruyninckx deelde deze zwart-wit foto van 14×9 cm in de Europeana Collections onder de titel: ‘Groepsfoto met kinderen in zakken van de American Commission for Relief in Belgium.’

Beschrijving: ‘Groepsfoto met Jeanne Caterine Charleer (°17 aug 1910 in Heverlee), bovenste rij, 7de van rechts. Kinderen in kledij van zakken van de ‘American Commission for Relief’, Amerikaanse vlag op de achtergrond. De foto is een familiestuk. Jeanne Caterine Charleer was de moeder van Robert Bruyninckx.’ [6]

Meisje in jurkje van Meelzak, afkomstig uit Californië. Afb.: collectie Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University, V.S.

Een meisje in New York ging op de foto in een ‘Belgisch’ jurkje met logo ‘Sperry Flour’ uit Californië.

 

 

 

 

Conclusie
Hoewel slechts twee primaire bronnen tot heden gevonden, kom ik toch tot een voorlopige conclusie over het ontstaan van het hergebruik van de Meelzakken tot kleding: dit is in België ter hand genomen op suggestie van de Amerikaanse hulpverleners. De Belgische vrouwen vonden de Meelzakken zó bijzonder, ze maakten er, behalve onderkleding, ook vlotte jurkjes van voor hun kinderen.

[1] Gubin, Eliane, Dictionnaire des femmes belges: XIXe et XXe siècle, p. 510-512; gw.geneanet.org: ‘Charlotte Hélène Frédérique Marie Speyer’

[2] Delmarcel, Guy, Pride of Niagara. Best Winter Wheat. Amerikaanse Meelzakken als textiele getuigen van Wereldoorlog I. Brussel, Jubelpark: Bulletin van de Koninklijke Musea voor Kunst en Geschiedenis, deel 84, 2013, p. 97-126

[3] Zie ook mijn blog: ‘Een Bekende Vlaamse Meelzak in Het Land van Nevele’ van 25 oktober 2018

[4] The Millers’ Belgian Relief Movement 1914-15 conducted by The Northwestern Miller. Final Report of its director William C. Edgar, Editor of the Northwestern Miller, MCMXV

[5] Drie bronnen om verder te lezen over ‘Feed Sacks’:
Linzee Kull McCray, Feed Sacks, The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric, 2016;
– Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood, For a few sacks more, online exhibition Textile Research Centre, Leiden, 2018
– Marian Ann J. Montgomery, Cotton and Thrift. Feed Sacks and the Fabric of American Households, 2019

[6] De groepsfoto met de kinderen in Heverlee in kleding van zakken met logo  ‘American Commission’ is afgedrukt in het artikel van  Ina Ruckebusch: ‘Belgische voedselschaarste en Amerikaanse voedselhulp tijdens WOI’ in: Patakon, tijdschrift voor bakerfgoed, 5 nr. 1 (2014), blz. 29.

 

 

Een geborduurde Paaszak in Gent: hulp aan de krijgsgevangenen

Sinds september 2018 liep ik rond met een groot vraagteken over ‘Zakken in WOI’, die ik zag in het Huis van Alijn in Gent. Ellen Rijckx, medewerker collectie/Studio Alijn, had me uitgenodigd vier ‘Meelzakken’ in hun collectie te komen bestuderen en documenteren.

‘Nieuwjaarszak 1916’ Huis van Alijn, Gent

De eerste zak die ik bekeek had aan een zijde een bedrukking met de tekst:

‘Nieuwjaar aan de Krijgsgevangenen * 1916 * Nouvel-An aux Prisonniers de Guerre.

Gent 6bis Bagattenstraat. Gent. Steendr. F.&F. Buyck. Gebroeders.’

De afbeelding was een tekening van de drie torens van Gent: de toren van de Sint-Niklaaskerk, de toren van Het Belfort van Gent, de toren van de Sint-Baafskathedraal, waarbij de initialen van de kunstenaar ‘JC’. Het Huis van Alijn heeft deze zak geschonken gekregen van de dochter van een man, geboren in 1888, die tijdens de Groote Oorlog krijgsgevangene is geweest in Duitsland.

De Gentse torens: St-Niklaas, Belfort en St.-Baafs, gefotografeerd vanaf de Sint Michielsbrug, foto: auteur
‘Paaszak 1916’ Huis van Alijn, Gent

De drie overige zakken waren aan een zijde bedrukt met de tekst:

‘Hulp aan Krijgsgevangenen * Secours aux Prisonniers de Guerre – Paschen 1916 Pâques’ Bagattenstraat, 6bis _ Gand, rue des Baguettes, 6bis. Gent. Steendr. F.&F. Buyck. Gebroeders’, en de tekening: de drie Gentse torens, St.-Niklaas, Belfort en St.-Baafs, en enkele tientallen vliegende klokken, voorzien van krachtig wiekende vleugels. Signering van de tekening: Jos Cornelis. Eén van de drie zakken is voorzien van borduurwerk.

Geborduurde ‘Paaszak 1916’, Huis van Alijn, Gent

De afmetingen van de vier zakken varieert enigszins, hoogte en breedte van de drie ‘Paaszakken’ zijn (hxb):
* inventarisnr. 90.004: 58,5 bij 36 cm,
* inventarisnr. VG 81-201: 55 bij 38 cm,
* inventarisnr. VG88-011: 56 bij 37 cm.
De ‘Nieuwjaar’zak, inventarisnr. VG 89-088, is 56 cm hoog, 38 cm breed.

De drie ‘Paaszakken’ herkende ik direct, omdat behalve het Huis van Alijn, ook:
– MoMu in Antwerpen (‘Zak oorlogstekstiel’, ‘openfashion.momu.be’: id OBJ 12539 T3487, h 55, br 37 cm);
– In Flanders Fields Museum in Ieper (‘Meelzak’, ‘collectie.ieper.be’: objectnr IFF 002546, h 59, br 36 cm),
een zak met exact deze bedrukking in de collectie hebben én ze zijn opgenomen in particuliere verzamelingen (onder meer collectie Frankie van Rossem) .

Maar waar ik naar keek, ik wist het niet. Het was me een raadsel waarom die torens en die vliegende klokken waren afgebeeld.

Bovendien vroeg ik me af: “Er is een geborduurde zak bij, maar zijn dit wel ‘Amerikaanse Meelzakken’?”

PASEN

Tot mijn grote blijdschap heb ik deze week op Witte Donderdag het raadsel van de gevleugelde klokken opgelost. Ik ben dankzij de zakken een paasverhaal gewaargeworden, dat ik als protestants opgegroeid meisje niet kende: het verhaal van de paasklokken.

Ik ontdekte dit artikeltje in de Belgische krant ‘Le Progrès Libéral’ van donderdag 26 maart 1915 met een bericht van Alphonse Delhaize & Cie, Bruxelles-Noord. Op 4 en 5 april zou het Pasen zijn, vandaar deze ‘advertorial’:

‘Le Progres Libéral’, 26 maart 1915

‘Paasverhaal. – Toen ik heel klein was, vertelde mijn moeder me en liet me geloven dat op Witte Donderdag de klokken de toren van onze kerk verlieten om de avond voor Eerste Paasdag terug te keren. Ze brachten dan mee, de vrede voor de wereld en snoepjes voor lieve kinderen. Ook dit jaar zullen de klokken terugkomen, ze brengen misschien nog geen vrede mee, maar op z’n minst hopen we, de voortekenen van een nabije en blijvende vrede. En ook zullen ze afleveren bij het filiaal van de firma

ADOLPHE DELHAIZE EN CIE

139-141, rue Neuve, Brussel-Noord

een enorme selectie van chocolade klokken en paaseieren, figuurtjes voor 1-april grappen, fondants en snoep van de hoogste kwaliteit. Ondanks de moeilijkheden van de huidige tijd, zal de verkoop zijn tegen de gebruikelijke, lage prijzen zonder enige verhoging. Eieren en paasfiguren voor 0,02, 0,05, 0,10 franc, etc. Speciale aanbiedingen van zoetwaren, vleeswaren, kazen, wijnen, likeuren, fruit, kruidenierswaren, enz., enz. Gegarandeerde kwaliteit en voordelige prijzen. – Permanente uitstalling. Absoluut Gratis Toegang. Koffie-corners. Bestellingen en bezorging aan huis is mogelijk.

Gevleugelde paasklokken

Wikipedia geeft een aanvulling op het verhaal van de gevleugelde paasklokken: In protestantse regio’s (Nederland, Duitsland, Angelsaksische landen, …) brengt de paashaas de paaseieren. Volgens de katholieke traditie (in België, Frankrijk en delen van Nederlands Limburg) brengen de paasklokken op Pasen chocolade- en suikereieren die ze tijdens het Paastriduüm zijn gaan halen in Rome. De klokken vertrekken na het Gloria van de H. Mis op Witte Donderdag naar Rome om er de eieren te halen en komen pas terug in de paasnacht. De klokken hebben de vorm van kerkklokken met vleugeltjes en vliegen door de lucht.

Verstopt paasei

De eieren worden gedropt in de tuin of op het balkon tussen de planten.

Paaseieren zoeken…

Een enthousiaste speurtocht op paasmorgen hoort dan uiteraard bij deze traditie.

 

 

JOS CORNELIS

Signering Jos Cornelis

De kunstenaar Jos Cornelis, ontwerper van de tekeningen op de zakken, had drie jaar eerder een poster ontworpen voor de Wereldtentoonstelling in 1913 in Gent. De achtergrond van deze poster toont ook de drie torens van Gent, St.-Niklaas, Belfort en St.-Baafs, hier in kleur: in goudgeel ochtendgloren.

Het raadsel van de torens en de vliegende klokken was voor mij opgelost. Maar toen de vraag naar de herkomst van de zakken in het Huis van Alijn.

HULP AAN KRIJGSGEVANGENEN

Het Huis van Alijn vermeldt in hun toelichting bij de vier zakken ‘Meelzak als oorlogssouvenir. Meelzak in wit katoen, dat als geschenk werd gegeven aan de krijgsgevangenen in Duitsland tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog’.

Op het spoor gezet van de Belgische krijgsgevangenen ontrafelen twee andere bronnen in combinatie de herkomst van de zakken.

Het ‘Huldeboek 1915’ van de stad Gent noemt de werkzaamheden van ‘L’ œuvre de secours aux prisonniers de Guerre’. Het comité staat onder leiding van mevrouw Alexandre De Hemptinne en heeft als doel geld en schenkingen in natura bijeen te brengen om de krijgsgevangenen in Duitsland te hulp te komen. Het verzorgt zendingen van kleding en levensmiddelen. Een groep toegewijde dames, meisjes, en enkele heren komen iedere ochtend bijeen in de bijgebouwen van het huis van mw. De Hemptinne om pakketten samen te stellen en te versturen. In 1915 waren er meer dan 11.000 pakketten kleding en 12.000 pakketten levensmiddelen verzonden naar Duitsland voor gevangenen afkomstig uit Gent en de provincies Oost en West Vlaanderen. (Ville de Gand, Œuvres de Philanthropie et de Dévouement créées pendant 1re Année de la Guerre, 3 août 1914 – août 1915, blz 47)

Voor de Nieuwjaarszending 1916 en de Paaspakketten in 1916 heeft het comité kennelijk speciale zakken laten naaien en bedrukken met een opbeurende groet in tekening en tekst voor de krijgsgevangenen. Eén van de ontvangers van een gevulde Paaszak is de Gentse literatuurhistoricus Paul Fredericq geweest. Hij was in maart 1916 gevangengezet in het burgerkamp te Gütersloh, Duitsland. Er is een zwart-wit foto van Fredericq in zijn kamer in gevangenschap.

‘Met de groeten van Paul Fredericq’, Het 14-18 Boek, Daniël Vanacker, foto: Bibliotheek Universiteit Gent

‘Op 6 mei 1916 kreeg hij een fotograaf*) op bezoek. Deze maakte dit kiekje in zijn kamer terwijl Fredericq aan het lezen was. Rechts van hem hangt een zak met een tekening van de paasklokken en de drie Gentse torens. In die zak had het Gentse comité voor hulp aan de krijgsgevangenen hem een hele ham bezorgd.’ (Het 14-18 Boek. De kleine Belgen in de Grote Oorlog, Daniël Vanacker, blz. 333, foto Bibliotheek Universiteit Gent)

En zo is de herkomst van de zakken in het Huis van Alijn – én die van MoMu en IFF- bekend. Het zijn geen ‘Amerikaanse meelzakken’, maar zakken, gemaakt in Gent, waarin door de Gentenaren hulpgoederen aan hun stadsgenoten in krijgsgevangenschap in Duitsland zijn gezonden.

BORDUREN

Binnenzijde geborduurde ‘Paaszak 1916’, Huis van Alijn, Gent

Handvaardigheid, schilderen en musiceren tijdens krijgsgevangenschap was een bekend tijdverdrijf. Borduurwerk werd ook gemaakt, vooropgesteld dat er materialen voor aanwezig waren. Het Huis van Alijn bezit één ‘Paaszak’, geborduurd met zwart garen. De contouren van de torens en de gevleugelde klokken lijken sterker aangezet door het borduurwerk dat in vrij grove stiksteken is uitgevoerd. De achterzijde van de zak is gedeeltelijk weggeknipt. Op het resterende doek zitten verfresten, roestvlekken en de zak is vuil, alsof het heeft dienstgedaan bij een schilderklus.

Gelukkig is de geborduurde Paaszak tijdig gered van een ondergang als poetslap en in deskundige bewaring bij het Huis van Alijn!

 

 

*) De fotograaf heeft die dag meer foto’s gemaakt in Gütersloh. In het artikel ‘Nevelse jeugdherinneringen van Paul Fredericq’ van J. van de Casteele staat op blz. 65 een groepsfoto van de Belgische gevangenen, bekenden van Fredericq die al eerder om politieke redenen waren opgepakt. Fredericq schrijft zijn jeugdherinneringen in Duitse gevangenschap, zijn grootmoeder Marie Comparé, ‘Grandmaman de Nevele’, speelt erin een hoofdrol. (Berichtenblad heemkundige kring Het Land van Nevele, juni 1979, blz. 63-92)

 

Quilt Zakken Parade

De Quilt Zakken die ik sinds januari 2018 heb gemaakt paraderen hier voorbij. Iedere dag geeft inspiratie voor nieuwe zakken!

Quilt Zak ‘Rokje’, h 63 cm, diam 40 cm
Quilt Zak Casper 65, h 69, br 48 cm
Quilt Zak van de Week, h 63 cm, diam 35 cm
Lente Quilt Zak, h 66 cm, diam 44 cm
Quilt Zak ‘Linzee’, h 54 cm, diam 26 cm
Quilt Zak ‘Koper’, h 36 cm, diam 23 cm
Quilt Zak ‘Lijntje’, h 36 cm, diam 23 cm
Quilt Zak ‘Nelleke’, h 55 cm, diam 28 cm
Caleidoscopische Quilt Zak, h 56 cm, diam 30 cm
Quilt Zak Japans, h 19 cm, diam 10 cm
Quilt Zak Godin, h 25 cm, diam 14 cm
Violen Quilt Zak, h 28 cm, diam 14 cm

Eén jaar later, 18 april 2019

Bezoek aan ‘For a few sacks more…’, TRC Leiden, 24 januari 2018
Met Linzee Kull McCray, auteur van ‘Feed Sacks, the colourful history of a frugal fabric’, Leiden, 2 februari 2018

Een tentoonstelling in het Textile Research Centre in Leiden, voorjaar 2018, openbaarde het wonderlijke bestaan van door Belgische vrouwen geborduurde, Amerikaanse meelzakken in de Eerste Wereldoorlog. Het enige tentoongestelde exemplaar had als herkomst ‘Edmonton, Alta’, dus kwam de zak uit Canada, maar ach, het speelde meer dan honderd jaar geleden. VS of Canada, vanuit Leiden bezien lagen die toen waarschijnlijk dichter bij elkaar, dacht ik nonchalant… En misschien kwam de meelzak wel uit de Tweede Wereldoorlog, want daar wist ik iets meer van dan van de Eerste…

Lezing van Dr. Marian Ann Montgomery in Leiden, 18 april 2018
In het Stadsarchief Brussel, 20 december 2018

De vraag naar de geschiedenis van de geborduurde, katoenen Amerikaanse meelzakken in buurland België, heeft me sinds 18 april 2018 niet meer losgelaten. Ik heb boeken gelezen, online gesurft, informatie opgevraagd, gecorrespondeerd, gesprekken gevoerd, musea bezocht, archief- en bibliotheekonderzoek gedaan in Antwerpen, Luik, Gent, Brussel, Hansbeke, Leiden, Rotterdam, Den Haag, Amsterdam. Mijn hoofd vulde zich met een overvloed aan informatie.

Met resultaat. In blogs, lezingen en artikelen vertel ik inmiddels met passie over wat ik te weten ben gekomen.

Lezing voor Probus Nieuw Teylingen in Sassenheim, 2 januari 2019
Centre de documentation, Musée de la Vie wallonne, Liège, 9 juli 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eén jaar later ken ik een paar honderd onbewerkte en bewerkte Meelzakken in WOI van daadwerkelijk zien of van foto’s. De grootste rijkdom is dat ik zelf twee geborduurde meelzakken bezit. Wat een prachtige versierde zakken! Het zorgvuldige en toegewijde handwerk overrompelt me iedere keer weer.

 

Vol inspiratie ben ik ook zelf begonnen quilt zakken te naaien van gerecyclede kleding, in lijn met de traditie van mijn voormoeders.

Annelien van Kempen, Caleidoscopische Quilt Zak, januari 2019

Zij hadden de taak hun gezinnen te voorzien van kleding, bed- en badgoed en alle textiel, die in het huishouden nodig was, waarbij zij eindeloos alle stoffen en draden in hun bezit, hergebruikten.

Jazeker, vanuit deze achtergrond kregen ook de meelzakken in WOI een tweede leven!

The Captain and Mrs. Albert Moulckers Collection 2

In mijn blog van 30 november 2018 rapporteerde ik over The Captain and Mrs. Albert Moulckers Collection. Ik deed een oproep aan lezers van het blog om te helpen om de Belgische schilders van de Meelzakken te identificeren.

Sindsdien heb ik enkele reacties ontvangen die vragen om een tweede blog over de collectie schilderingen.

Kopie van het artikel in de Beaumont Journal

Vanuit de Verenigde Staten heb ik toegestuurd gekregen een krantenartikel uit de Beaumont Journal, Port Arthur, Texas, verschenen in de jaren ’60. De tekst luidt:

Area Woman has Collection of Art on Flour Sacks

By Dorothy Marcantel
Port Arthur (Sp)- A Port Arthur woman who is a native of Brussels, Belgium, has what is probably one of the most interesting-and certainly the most unusual-collection of paintings that could be found anywhere.

Mrs. Julienne Moulckers of 3105 Fifth St., wife of a longtime Gulf Oil Corp. ship’s master Capt. Albert Moulckers, has 58 paintings done by Belgium artists on flour sacks.
THE SACKS came from flour that was sent to Belgium by the United States during and immediately after World War I as a special aid “to see that the children of Belgium would have bread”.
Mrs. Moulckers says her maternal grandfather, Theodore Groeles (or Jeorges-she gave two spellings, one in Flemish and one in French) ran a bakery in Brussels, specializing in fine pastries, before the war.
During and immediately after the war, Grandfather Groeles was required to bake a given amount of bread for each child within his district with the American-aid flour. The children were issued the bread on ration basis.
The “flour sack paintings” are a result of Mrs. Moulckers’ own father’s resourcefulness. Her father, the late Edouard Seurlien, was manager of what Mrs. Moulckers describes as a private club and gallery for artists.
“DURING THE war it was almost impossible to get regular artist’s canvas-so father suggested the artists use the flour sacks,” Mrs. Moulckers says. The sacks were in abundant supply it seems, and the sacks were easily obtained from Grandfather Groels’ bakery.

The paintings in Mrs. Moulckers collection all were done between the years of 1914 and 1918 and most are inscribed. The paintings chiefly are of Belgium landscapes and street scenes, and some are portraits.
Some of the paintings are stretched on regular canvas frames, and some are both stretched and framed, but a number of them are kept carefully folded.
“My father gave the paintings to me before he died in 1958, and I have had only the ones I liked best framed,” the owner explained.

Foto bij het artikel in de Beaumont Journal

ALMOST ALL of the collection was exhibited and well received at a recent showing at the Gates Memorial Library Gallery at Port Arthur. In fact, the exhibit was scheduled for a one-week showing only, but was allowed to remain up from March 18 through April 13 because of the response from the viewers.
Mrs. Moulckers says she will consider exhibiting the paintings in other area galleries if there are requests for the exhibit. She also says she will consider selling some of the paintings, but at the present she and Capt. Moulckers are engaged in building a new home, and she is not readily available.

Capt. Moulckers also is a native of Brussels and worked for the Gulf Oil Corp. maritime division a long time before the couple moved to this country in 1952. He has worked for the company a total of 35 years. They both become naturalized citizens of this country.
CAPT. MOULCKERS, because of his profession, was able to return to his homeland more often than Mrs. Moulckers has since they came here. Lately, he is in command of ships going coastwise along this continent and does not sail abroad.
Mrs. Moulckers returned to Brussels in 1956 at the death of her mother and again in 1958, when her father died.
Capt. And Mrs. Moulckers have one son, Frank, who is an accountant and lives in Beaumont.

De informatie in het artikel zal de bron zijn geweest voor het artikel ‘From Aid to Art’ van Carol Austin in ‘A Report’, Fall 1986. *)

‘FEUILLIEN’ en ‘GROULUS’

Groot was mijn verrassing toen ik de werkelijke meisjesnaam van Julienne Moulckers op het spoor kwam.
Vanuit Wilsele, een deelgemeente van Leuven, provincie Vlaams-Brabant in België heb ik van de heer Hubert Bovens, gespecialiseerd in opzoekingen naar families, bijzonder interessante informatie ontvangen die de familiegeschiedenis van het echtpaar Moulckers ontrafelt.

‘Albert’ Marie Octave MOULCKERS is op 23 december 1907 te Antwerpen geboren. Zijn ouders heten Joseph “Jos” Hubert Charles MOULCKERS, gemeenteonderwijzer, geboren te Lanaye en Marie “Lucie” Charlotte SWEERTS, geboren te Antwerpen.
Albert Moulckers is in Texas op 13 januari 1989 overleden, hij was 81 jaar oud.

Julienne Moulckers is op 4 augustus 1910 geboren in Brussel. De meisjesnaam van Julienne is FEUILLIEN.
Haar ouders heten Edouard Jean FEUILLIEN ( Brussel 18/12/1885- Sint -Agatha-Berchem 3/6/1966), employé, (in 1909) en Alice Joséphine Virginie GROULUS (Sint-Gilles, Brabant, 11/1/1889- ?). Het paar huwt op 23 augustus 1909.
Haar grootouders langs vaderskant zijn Célestin François FEUILLIEN, gérant du Cercle Artistique (in 1909), en Marie Honorine BONDELE.

Julienne’s grootouders langs moederskant zijn François Théodore GROULUS, pâtissier, en Julie Joseph GATY, servante.
Julienne is overleden in Texas op 9 juni 1994, zij was 83 jaar.

Haar vader’s en meisjes naam is dus FEUILLIEN en niet ‘Seurlein’. de naam van haar grootvader van moeder’s kant is GROULUS en niet ‘Groeles’ of ‘Jeorges’.

Cercle Artistique et Littéraire

Edouard Feuillien links op de voorgrond in 1950 (Afb. Nicolas Gérome).

De werkelijke namen geven toegang tot een ruime bron van informatie over de ‘Cercle Artistique et Littéraire’ in Brussel, waar zowel vader als grootvader Feuillien kennelijk de scepter hebben gezwaaid.
Edouard Feuillien zal zijn vader zijn opgevolgd bij de Cercle Artistique et Littéraire. In zijn rouwbrief van 3 juni 1966 staat als titel: ‘Directeur-Gérant Honoraire du Cercle Royal Gaulois Artistique et Littéraire’. Blijkens de rouwbrief heeft hij voorname onderscheidingen ontvangen voor zijn werk:
– Chevalier de l’Ordre de Léopold-Officier de l’Ordre de Léopold
– Officier d’Académie et Ordre du Mérite Francais.

De Cercle Artistique et Littéraire was een Brusselse vereniging van beeldende kunstenaars, musici en schrijvers in 1847 officieel opgericht. In 1951 is de vereniging gefuseerd met de Cercle Royal Gaulois tot de huidige Cercle Royal Gaulois Artistique et Littéraire. Op Wikipedia is een opsomming te vinden van de namen van kunstenaars die tentoonstellingen hebben gehad in de Cercle Artistique et Littéraire. In de oorlogsjaren 1914-1918 liggen de exposities stil. In de jaren ervoor en erna behoren de kunstenaars van wie werk in de Moulckers Collection voorkomt, tot de exposanten. Onder meer Guillaume Van Strydonck (1913), Jehan Frisan (1920), Marguérite Verboeckhoven (1909), Georges Vanzevenberghen (1909), Gaston Haustraete (1911 en 1922), Ernest Godfrinon (1922), Jean-FrancoisTaelemans (1922).

Th. Groulus Gathy Patissier-Glacier

De bakkerij/patisserie van Grootvader Groulus op een oude ansichtkaart.

Dankzij een nazaat van de familie van Julienne Moulckers heb ik bijgaande foto ontvangen. De bakkerij-patisserie van Grootvader Groulus was gevestigd op de Boulevard du Hainaut in Brussel. Deze oude ansichtkaart toont een foto van de gevel en de etalage. Saillant detail is de tweede naam ‘Gathy’ als aanduiding van de familie van grootmoeder Julie, die in haar geboortebewijs ‘GATY’ als familienaam heeft. In de winkelnaam is een H toegevoegd: ‘GATHY’.

Het familie-archief bevat onder meer ook emigratie en reisdocumenten van Albert, die als 20-jarige en ongehuwd reeds van Bermuda naar de VS voer, Julienne, die met SABENA op 2 augustus 1956 met haar vader van Brussel naar New York vloog, en zoon Francis, geboren 11 mei 1932, die op 22 januari 1954 genaturaliseerd werd in de Verenigde Staten.

Conclusie

De ontvangen reacties hebben een aanzienlijke bijdrage geleverd in de verdere ontknoping van de achtergronden van de Beschilderde Meelzakken in de Moulckers Collection!

Waarom het artikel in de Beaumont Journal twee maal melding maakt van het overlijden van Julienne’s vader in 1958, terwijl de rouwbrief aantoont dat Edouard Feuillien op 3 juni 1966 is overleden, is voor mij een raadsel.
Hopelijk is te achterhalen op welke datum het artikel in de krant heeft gestaan.

 

*) Austin, Carole, ‘From Aid to Art: Decorated Flour Sacks from World War I’, A Report from the San Francisco Craft and Folk Art Museum, San Francisco, Californië, VS, Fall 1986

 

 

Versierde Meelzakken in het Koninklijk Legermuseum, Brussel 2

In mijn blogs van 18 februari en 4 maart 2019 kwamen vier Versierde Meelzakken in de collectie van het War Heritage Institute (WHI) in Brussel aan de orde.

De zaal van de Eerste Wereldoorlog in het Koninklijk Legermuseum, Brussel. Foto: auteur

In dit blog zoom ik in op nog vijf Versierde Meelzakken in de collectie van het Koninklijk Legermuseum.
Van drie Meelzakken, de nummers 1), 2) en 3) is door de bedrukking de herkomst uit de Verenigde Staten te achterhalen. Twee items, de nummers 4) en 5) zijn zonder bedrukking, maar door materiaalgebruik en presentatie te herleiden tot een Versierde Meelzak in WOI.

1) Gold Dust (in vitrine zaal WOI)

‘Hommage aux Etats-Unis – La Belgique Reconnaissante 1914 1915’ (Vertaling: Hulde aan de Verenigde Staten – Dankbaar België 1914 1915). Coll. WHI inv nr 95001494, foto: auteur

De Meelzak ‘Gold Dust’ van de meelfabriek Thornton & Chester, Buffalo in de staat New York, is een halve slag gedraaid en in de breedte bewerkt. In rood garen is in sierlijke blokletters met ferme kruissteken dankbaarheid uitgedrukt.

De vlaggen van België en de VS zijn met elkaar gekruist in het midden van het borduurwerk. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

De lettervormen van het alfabet en de cijfers zijn zorgvuldig gekozen, geschikt om in kruissteek uit te voeren en kaarsrecht op het doek gezet. Het borduurwerk roept associaties op met de Nederlandse merklap. Misschien diende het als een oefening in borduren voor een meisje in opleiding.

Dezelfde, maar onbewerkte, Meelzak ‘Gold Dust’ is in de collectie van het Koninklijk Museum voor Kunst en Geschiedenis (KMKG-MRAH)  aanwezig.[1]
De firma Thornton & Chester dateerde van 1868 en had meerdere meelfabrieken langs de Buffalo River gevestigd.

 

2) American Commission (in depot)

Geborduurde Meelzak ‘American Commission’. Coll. WHI, inv.nr. 4510210, foto: auteur

Een indrukwekkend borduurpatroon is uitgevoerd op de Meelzak ‘American Commission’. De letters zijn versierd in de kleuren van de Amerikaanse vlag. Daarboven wapperen uitbundig 6 vlaggen om een schild met de Vlaamse leeuw, eronder twee groene lauwertakken, bijeengebonden door een sierlijk rood-wit lint. De jaartallen 1914 1915 1916 staan prominent vermeld.

Detail bovenzijde. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

De Meelzak kan een kussenovertrek zijn geweest, rondom gedecoreerd met een koord in de kleuren zwart, geel en rood.

Versierde Meelzakken met de naam ‘American Commission’ zijn wereldwijd veelvuldig aanwezig in de verzamelingen van musea en particulieren.
De ‘American Commission for Relief in Belgium’, kortweg ‘American Commission’ is in Londen in oktober 1914 geformeerd met als directeur de Amerikaan Herbert Hoover. De American Commission stelde zich ten doel de noodlijdende bevolking van bezet België te hulp te komen met voedsel en kleding.
Later is de aanduiding ‘American’ vervallen en sindsdien is de naam:  ‘Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB)’. Het inkoopbureau voor graan van de American Commission was gevestigd in Londen. Het bureau kocht wereldwijd meel in voor België en liet, naar ik aanneem, voor de eerste voedselhulpactie in het najaar van 1914 de Meelzakken bedrukken met ‘American Commission’.

3) Peerless Flour (in depot)

Met kennelijk plezier is de deegroller en de vlinder met contouren extra accent gegeven. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Bewerkte Meelzak van Preston-Shaffer Milling Co. Waitsburg, WA. Coll. WHI, inv. nr. 9500126. foto: auteur

De bewerkte Meelzak uit de staat Washington van Preston-Shaffer Milling Co. in Waitsburg is uitbundig geborduurd. Tekst en logo zijn in heldere kleuren rood, groen, geel, zwart, blauw en wit versierd.

De achterzijde van het borduurwerk van de Meelzak van Preston-Shaffer Milling Co. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

De meelfabriek was opgericht in 1865 door de molenaar Sylvester M. Wait, die na een jaar de helft van het bedrijf verkocht aan de broers Preston en in 1870 de andere helft. Waitsburg is in 1868 vernoemd naar oprichter Wait. In de 80er jaren van de negentiende eeuw werd de meelfabriek bekend als Washington Mills. De aanleg van spoorlijnen verbond Waitsburg via Walla Walla met de havenstad Portland. William B. Shaffer werd productieleider van de fabriek in 1886 en na succesvolle jaren van ontwikkeling en vooruitgang onder zijn leiding werd hij in 1911 mede-eigenaar van de Preston-Shaffer Milling Corporation. Merknamen waren ‘Peerless’ (‘ongeëvenaard’) voor een fijne kwaliteit bloem en ‘Pure White’ voor een universeel, ‘familie’ meel.

De meelfabriek was 92 jaar continu in bedrijf tot de sluiting in 1957. Waitsburg is nog altijd een vooraanstaand graan producerende streek.

Om een indruk te krijgen van dezelfde, onbewerkte Meelzak Peerless Flour van Washington Mills, is in de collectie van het KMKG-MRAH in Brussel een exemplaar aanwezig.[1]

4) Etui (in depot)

Het opengevouwen etui toont de achterkant van het borduurwerk. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Etui met geborduurde heraldiek. Coll. WHI, inv.nr. 802735, foto: auteur

Een klein etui is rijkelijk geborduurd met heraldiek en patriottisch motief. Midden twee Belgische vlaggen met het wapen van de leeuw, links twee Britse vlaggen. Tussen de Franse vlaggen prijkt een wapen met het monogram ER, Elisabeth Regina. Het zal een verwijzing zijn naar de Belgische koningin Elisabeth, die tijdens de bezetting net over de grens in Frankrijk verblijft.

Enige bedrukking of ander bewijs van een Meelzak ontbreekt, maar de voorstelling en de jaartallen 1914-1915 en het gebruikte doek geven aanleiding om te vermoeden: dit moet een ‘Versierde Meelzak’ zijn.

5) Mme Vve E Lefranc De Ley (in depot)

Mme Vve. E. Lefranc De Ley, Oudaen 41,  Anvers    (vertaling: Mevr. Wed. E, Lefranc De Ley, Oudaen 41, Antwerpen). Coll. WHI, inv.nr. 201200474, foto: auteur

Een bijzonder item in de collectie Versierde Meelzakken is het kleed van mevrouw Eug. Lefranc De Ley. Een stuk wit katoenen doek heeft een omranding in dezelfde stof en waar de stof vakbekwaam aan elkaar is genaaid, is een golvende sierrand in rood garen geborduurd. Onderaan is, cursief  geplaatst, naam en adres van de borduurster.

De achterzijde van het borduurwerk. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

Mevrouw Lefranc De Ley blijkt een vooraanstaande uitvoerdster van borduurwerk te zijn geweest. In 1923 vervaardigde zij bijvoorbeeld de vlag van het ‘Personeel van het Departement van Financiën NS van de Gewestelijke Afdeeling Antwerpen’. Dit professioneel uitgevoerde borduurwerk van zijde heeft ze gesigneerd, haar naam staat geborduurd in de linker onderhoek, net boven de goudkleurig franjes. Evenzo was zij uitvoerder van de Vlag van de Centrale der Steendrukkers Afdeeling Antwerpen. Of we hier te maken hebben met een Meelzak is moeilijk vast te stellen en vraagt nader onderzoek, bijvoorbeeld van het doek.

Conclusie

De collectie -geborduurde- Versierde Meelzakken van het Koninklijk Legermuseum in Brussel is zo rijk en divers, dat het een prachtige gelegenheid biedt om het werk van de Belgische borduursters anno 1914-1918 te onderzoeken.

[1] Delmarcel, Guy, Pride of Niagara. Best Winter Wheat. Amerikaanse Meelzakken als textiele getuigen van Wereldoorlog I. Figuur 5 op blz 111. Bulletin van de Koninklijke Musea voor Kunst en Geschiedenis, Jubelpark, Brussel, deel 84, 2013.