Round trip Kansas-Limburg in seven steps

At the end of the year 2020, in which travelling for people became increasingly difficult due to the measures against the corona virus, I would like to tell you about the journey of flour sacks from the state of Kansas in the US to the province of Limburg in Belgium and back: Kansas-Limburg in seven steps.

The flour sack journey from Kansas to Limburg and vice versa took place in fifteen months, between November 1914 and February 1916.

1) In November and December 1914, the Kansas Belgian Relief Fund, led by former Governor W.R. Stubbs, collected money for relief supplies to be sent to the population of occupied Belgium. The committee used the gifts to purchase flour from local mills to a total value of $ 400,000.

Railroad car with inscription “Kansas Flour for Belgium Relief, Topeka, Kan.” Photo: National WWI Museum, Kansas City, Missouri

The cargo went by railroad to New York Harbor, there were 150 railroad cars loaded with 50,000 barrels of flour, the equivalent of about 200,000 sacks of flour.

 

Departure of SS Hannah from New York. Photo: The Topeka Daily Capital Sun, January 10, 1915

2) On January 5, 1915, steamship Hannah, loaded with the relief goods collected by the people of Kansas, left New York Harbor.
The ship was waved goodbye by hundreds of people. The Kansas delegation at the harbor consisted of 50 people.

Josephine Bates-White hoists the flag in the top. Photo: NYT, January 17, 1915
Josephine Bates, née White. Photo: online

Mrs. Josephine Bates, neé White (Portage-du-Fort, Québec, Canada, 08.07.1862 – Yorktown, New York, USA, 20.10.1934), together with the captain of the ship, hoisted the flag from the mast.
Josephine Bates was known by her husband’s name as Mrs. Lindon W. Bates. She was the Chairwoman of the Woman’s Section of the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).

The Woman’s Section was founded in New York in November 1914 with the aim of bringing all women’s organizations in the US under one umbrella to coordinate their many lavish relief efforts for Belgium.

The Woman’s Section of the CRB. Photo: The History of the Woman’s Section, February 26, 1915
Ida M. Walker, née Abrahams , Chairwoman of the CRB Woman’s Section for the State of Kansas. Photo: online

The Chairwoman of the Woman’s Section for the State of Kansas was Ms. Ida M. Walker, née Abrahams (Kansas, USA, 2/22/1886 – Norton, Kansas, USA, 6/18/1968). She continued the fundraising campaigns for Belgium even after the departure of the Hannah. In May 1915 she campaigned for the collection of 10,000 food boxes and repeated this in December as a Christmas campaign.

 

 

The Topeka Daily State Journal, May 4, 1915

3) On January 27, 1915, SS Hannah moored in the Maashaven in Rotterdam. Transshipment of relief goods in inland vessels for transit to the provinces in Belgium started immediately. The ships run fixed routes to the Belgian cities and villages.

New Britain Daily Herald, February 27, 1915

The distribution of the relief supplies was overseen by Mr. Charles F. Scott of Iola, Kansas, farmer’s son, owner of The Iola Daily Register newspaper and former Kansas State MP.

May Scott, née Ewing. Youth photo: online

He was married to May Ewing Scott, a politically active woman. Scott had come over specifically for this purpose at the insistence of the CRB. He traveled at his own expense and risk, a significant detail, as a competing newspaper spread falsehoods by stating that Scott used the Kansas people’s money raised for Belgium for his “jaunt.”
Thanks to Scott’s report of his journey by telegram dated February 8, 1915 from London, it was announced in Kansas that the cargo of the Hannah had arrived in good order with the Belgian population. Scott was back in Kansas in late February, providing a vivid account of his journey at the Auditorium in the capital, Topeka, on March 10, 1915, before an audience of nearly 2,000. His visit to Cardinal Mercier in Malines made a big impression. In the months that followed, Scott had a full schedule of lectures about his trip and reached a large audience.

The Food Committee of Tessenderloo, province of Limburg, Belgium, with CRB-delegate Tracey Kittredge. Photo: “In Occupied Belgium”, Robert Withington, 1922
Decorated flour sack “Blue Bell”’, Russell Milling Co.; embroidered by Caroline Gielen, Bilzen, Belgium. Coll. and photo: KSHS

4) Meanwhile in Limburg the sacks of flour had been emptied at the bakeries and handed over to charity organizations and (monastery) schools. Embroiderers went to work decorating Kansas’ flour sacks, in Bilzen, Hasselt, Hoesselt, Lommel and Neerpelt, among others.

– Caroline Gielen (Bilzen, 28.01.1888) in Bilzen was 27 years old in 1915. She embroidered a flour sack “Blue Bell” from Russell Milling Company, Russell, with the text “God bless you” and an appliqué American flag. She applied a wide strip of ribbon, hand-painted with golden sheaves of grain, all around.
Caroline’s father, Charles Gielen (Bilzen 23.03.1847 – Bilzen 01-01-1926), was a member of the “Permanent Deputation” (now “Deputation“), the executive body of the province of Limburg. Her mother was Marie Jeannette Georgine Robertine Gielen (Bilzen 07.06.1859 – Bilzen 09.11.1937).

Decorated flour sack “Riley County”; embroidered by Angèle Veltkamp, ​​Hasselt. Coll. and photo: KSHS

– Angèle Veltkamp (Hasselt 18.05.1898 – Embourg 31.10.1975) in Hasselt was 17 years old in 1915. She worked on a flour sack “Kansas Flour for Relief in Belgium” by the residents of Riley County, filled up with flour by The Manhattan Milling Co., Manhattan. With shiny silk threads she embroidered the small coat of arms of Belgium with the motto “L’union fait la force” (“Unity is strength”) and the Order of Leopold. “Reconnaissance à L’Amérique” (“Gratitude to America”) is in an arc over the coat of arms, the years 1914-1915 and the name of the municipality “Hasselt”. The flour sack is unfolded and edged with red, yellow and black string. In the middle is an artful bow with a red, yellow and black ribbon.
After the war, Angèle Veltkamp married Maurice Schuermans on 27 September 1919 in Elen (Sint-Gillis 17.02.1889 – Luik 22.01.1976); he was an aeronautical engineer.

Decorated “Pawnee County” flour sack; embroidered by Orphanage Hoesselt. Coll. and photo: KSHS

– The “Orphanage” in Hoeselt embroidered a flour sack from Pawnee County. They cut the sack into strips and put a wide edge of bobbin lace between and around it. The embroidered text read: “From Pawnee County 1000 sacks Flour 1914 donated 1915 to Belgium Sufferers Remembrance Orphanage Hoesselt Kansas U.S.A.”

– The Orphelinat St. Joseph of the Réligieuses de la Providence (Orphanage St. Joseph of the Sisters of Providence) in Hoeselt embroidered a flour sack from the mill D. Gerster, Burlington with the brand name ”Excelsior-Water Mill-Victor”. A banner bore the text “Dieu bénisse nos Bienfaiteurs” (“God bless our benefactors”). The flags of Belgium, France and the US were added. A ribbon in red, yellow and black bordered the flour sack.

Embroidered flour sack ‘Victor’ , D. Gerster, Burlington; embroidery by Orphelinat, Hoesselt. Coll. and photo: KSHS
Decorated flour sack “Kaw Flour”, Kaw Milling Co. (verso); embroidered by Gabriëlle Tournier, Lommel. Coll. and photo: KSHS

– Gabriëlle Tournier (Lommel 17.03.1898 – Hasselt 13.06.1971) in Lommel was 17 years old in 1915. She transformed a flour sack from Kaw Milling Co., Topeka, into a cushion cover with a red, yellow and black ribbon and a border of golden yellow ribbon. The flour sack, originally printed on both sides, has the brand name “Perfection Flour” on one side, with an image of an eagle with open wings and grain stalks between its legs.

Decorated flour sack “Kaw Flour”, Kaw Milling Co. (recto); embroidered by Gabriëlle Tournier, Lommel. Coll. and photo: KSHS

The other side bears a smaller bird as a logo. It is embroidered in blue and white bordered by stalks of grain. Underneath an appliqué with an embroidered Belgian flag and “L’Union fait la Force”. The brand name “Kaw” refers to the river Kaw, also known as the “Kansas river”.
Gabriëlle Tournier married Joseph Clercx (Neerpelt 23.02.1894 – Hasselt 26.06.1991), Veteran 1914-1918; Croix de guerre (“Cross of War”) 1914-1918. They had six children, two daughters and four sons.

 

Decorated flour sack from Imboden Milling Co.; embroidered in Neerpelt. Coll. and photo: KSHS

– In Neerpelt there is a flour sack from the Imboden Milling Company, Wichita, embroidered by Maria Moonen with the text “Merci à l’Amérique” with the Belgian and American flags and a bow in red, yellow and black. A ribbon in the colors of the American flag is woven through the fabric. The sack is edged with a wide bobbin lace rim.

 

Decorated flour sack Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa (recto); name embroiderer unknown. Coll. and photo: KSHS

– A flour sack from Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa, is embroidered by an unknown embroiderer (Madame Jean Noots?). All printed letters and the logo are over-embroidered in the colors red, yellow, black, with blue and gold. The sack is originally printed on both sides. The worker of the flour sack has finished the edges with gold-colored fringed straps, fastened with threads in red, yellow and black.

Decorated flour sack Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa (recto); name embroiderer unknown. Coll. and photo: KSHS

 

 

 

5) Autumn 1915 a series of decorated flour sacks, including the Limburg embroidery works described above, was given as a gift to CRB delegates as thanks for the food relief. The decorated flour sacks have been transported from Brussels to Rotterdam and from there to the CRB office in London.

Stella Stubbs, née Hostetler, the wife of ex-gov. W.R. Stubbs. Photo: online

In London, Millard K. Shaler, secretary of the CRB, commissioned seven Kansas flour sacks to ex-gov. Stubbs from the Kansas Belgian Relief Fund in Topeka and included a thank you letter.

The Topeka Daily Capital, February 6, 1916

6) In February 1916, the seven decorated Kansas flour sacks arrived via Mr. Stubbs at Secretary Dillon of the Kansas Belgian Relief Fund in Topeka. On February 6, The Topeka Daily Capital published an article under the headline “Belgian Children Embroider Flour Sacks from Kansas”, featuring a photo of four of the seven flour sacks. The caption read “Kansas Flour Sacks Embroidered by Appreciative Belgians Whose Lives Were Saved by the Generosity of Charitable Kansans”.

Advertisement mentions the flour sacks display in The Mills Stores Company’s window display. The Topeka Daily State Journal, February 7, 1916

The decorated flour sacks were immediately displayed to the public in a shop window in the center of the city. They then moved to the State Historical Building in Topeka to be preserved “as a lasting memento of the great European war and Kansas’s part in helping the Belgians.”

Collection of seven decorated flour sacks at the Kansas Museum of History. Photos: KSHS; collage Annelien van Kempen

7) Today the seven decorated flour sacks are part of the Kansas History Museum collection of the Kansas Historical Society. At the time, the Historical Society received the flour sacks from the Kansas Belgian Relief Fund.

Stadsmus Hasselt, “The taste of war”, February 2015. Photo: website Sint Willibrordus school, Eisden-Maasmechelen, Belgium

In February 2015, the Riley County embroidered flour sack, embroidered by Angèle Veltkamp for the municipality of Hasselt, returned temporarily to Belgium. The Kansas History Museum lent the memento to the “Stadsmus”, the city museum of Hasselt, for the exhibition “The taste of war”.

As a result, this decorated flour sack once again, one hundred years later, made the “Round trip Kansas-Limburg”, though this time directly.

Round trip Kansas-Limburg in seven steps. Timeline design: Annelien van Kempen

 

Special thanks to Hubert Bovens, Wilsele, Belgium, specialized in researching the biographical data of artists, for the research of the biographical data of the three Limburg embroiderers Caroline Gielen, Angèle Veltkamp and Gabriëlle Tournier. Special thanks to Michaël Closquet from Rocourt; he provided the dates of death of both Angèle Veltkamp and her husband Maurice Schuermans.

 

Retour Kansas – Limburg in zeven etappes

Bij de afsluiting van het jaar 2020 waarin reizen voor mensen steeds meer hindernissen gaf door de maatregelen tegen het corona-virus, vertel ik in dit blog het reisverhaal van meelzakken van de staat Kansas in de VS naar de provincie Limburg in België en terug: retour Kansas-Limburg in zeven etappes.

De zakkenreis van Kansas naar Limburg vice versa vond plaats in vijftien maanden tijd tussen november 1914 en februari 1916.

1) Kansas – New York, november, december 1914
In november en december 1914 zamelde het Kansas Belgian Relief Fund, onder leiding van voormalig gouverneur W.R. Stubbs, geld in voor hulpgoederen voor de bevolking in bezet België. Het comité kocht hiermee meel in zakken bij lokale maalderijen tot een totale waarde van $400.000.

Treinwagon met opschrift ‘Kansas Flour for Belgium Relief, Topeka, Kan. Foto: National WWI Museum, Kansas City, Missouri

Per spoor ging de lading naar de haven van New York, ongeveer 150 treinwagons vol met circa 50.000 barrels meel, het equivalent van circa 200.000 zakken meel.

 

 

Vertrek van SS Hannah uit New York. Foto: The Topeka Daily Capital Sun, 10 januari 1915

2) New York – Rotterdam, januari 1915
Op 5 januari 1915 vertrok stoomschip Hannah volgeladen met de hulpgoederen van Kansas uit de haven van New York.
Het schip werd uitgezwaaid door honderden mensen. De Kansas-delegatie ter plekke was 50 personen.

Josephine Bates-White hijst de vlag in top. Foto: NYT, 17 januari 1915
Josephine Bates, née White. Foto: online

Mevrouw Josephine Bates, neé White (Portage-du-Fort, Québec, Canada, 08.07.1862 – Yorktown, New York, VS, 20.10.1934) hees samen met de kapitein van het schip de vlag in de mast.
Josephine Bates was onder de naam van haar man bekend als Mrs. Lindon W. Bates en voorzitster van de Woman’s Section van de Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB).

De Woman’s Section was in november 1914 in New York opgericht met als doel álle vrouwenorganisaties in de VS onder één paraplu te brengen om hun vele uitbundige hulpacties voor België te coördineren.

The Woman’s Section of the CRB. Foto: The History of the Woman’s Section , 26 februari 1915
Ida M. Walker, née Abrahams Foto: online

De voorzitster van de Woman’s Section voor de staat Kansas was mevrouw Ida M. Walker, née Abrahams (Kansas, VS, 22.02.1886 – Norton, Kansas, VS, 18.06.1968). Zij zette ook na het vertrek van de Hannah de inzamelingsacties voor België voort. In mei 1915 voerde ze campagne voor de inzameling van 10.000 voedseldozen en herhaalde dit nogmaals in december als kerstactie.

 

 

The Topeka Daily State Journal, 4 mei 1915

3) Limburg, januari, februari 1915
Op 27 januari 1915 meerde SS Hannah aan in de Maashaven in Rotterdam. Het overladen van hulpgoederen in binnenvaartschepen voor doorvoer naar de provincies in België startte onmiddelijk. De schepen voeren vaste routes naar de Belgische steden en dorpen.

New Britain Daily Herald, 27 februari 1915

Toezicht op de distributie van de hulpgoederen werd uitgevoerd door de heer Charles F. Scott uit Iola, Kansas, boerenzoon, eigenaar van de krant ‘The Iola Daily Register’ en oud-Republikeins parlementslid van de staat Kansas.

May Scott, née Ewing. Jeugdfoto: online

Hij was getrouwd met May Ewing Scott, een politiek actieve vrouw. Scott was op aandringen van de CRB speciaal overgekomen voor dit doel. Hij reisde voor eigen rekening en risico, een betekenisvol detail, omdat een concurrerende krant leugens in de wereld bracht door te verklaren dat Scott het ingezamelde geld van de Kansas bevolking voor België gebruikte voor zijn ‘snoepreisje’.
Dankzij het verslag van Scott over zijn reis, per telegram van 8 februari vanuit Londen, werd bekend gemaakt in Kansas dat de lading van de ‘Hannah’ in goede orde bij de Belgische bevolking was aangekomen. Scott was eind februari terug in Kansas en gaf in het Auditorium in de hoofdstad Topeka op 10 maart 1915 voor bijna 2000 toehoorders en levendig verslag van zijn reis. Zijn bezoek aan Kardinaal Mercier in Mechelen maakte grote indruk. Ook in de maanden daarna had Scott een volle agenda met lezingen over zijn reis en bereikte een groot publiek.

Het Voedingskomiteit van Tessenderloo, provincie Limburg, met CRB vertegenwoordiger Tracey Kittredge.  Foto: ‘In Occupied Belgium’, Robert Withington, 1922
Versierde meelzak ‘Blue Bell’, Russell Milling Co; borduurwerk Caroline Gielen, Bilzen. Coll. en foto: KSHS

4) Limburg, 1915
Onderwijl in Limburg waren de zakken meel geleegd bij de bakkers en overgeleverd aan liefdadigheidsorganisaties en (klooster)scholen. Borduursters gingen aan het werk voor het versieren van Kansas’ meelzakken, onder meer in Bilzen, Hasselt, Hoeselt, Lommel en Neerpelt.

Caroline Gielen (Bilzen, 28.01.1888) in Bilzen was 27 jaar in 1915. Zij borduurde een meelzak ‘Blue Bell’ van Russell Milling Company, Russell, met toevoeging van de tekst ‘God bless you‘ en een appliqué-Amerikaanse vlag. Ze zette rondom een brede strook band aan, handbeschilderd met goudgele korenschoven. De vader van Caroline, Charles Gielen (Bilzen 23.03.1847 – Bilzen 01-01-1926) is gedeputeerde (lid van de Bestendige Deputatie) van de provincie Limburg geweest. Haar moeder was Marie Jeannette Georgine Robertine Gielen (Bilzen 07.06.1859 – Bilzen 09.11.1937).

Versierde meelzak ‘Riley County; borduurwerk Angèle Veltkamp, Hasselt. Coll. en foto: KSHS

Angèle Veltkamp (Hasselt 18.05. 1898 – Embourg 31.10.1975) was 17 jaar in 1915 en woonde in Hasselt. Zij werkte aan een meelzak ‘Kansas Flour for Relief in Belgium‘ van de inwoners van Riley County, gevuld door de maalderij The Manhattan Milling Co., Manhattan. Ze borduurde met glanzende zijden garens het klein wapen van België met de wapenspreuk ‘L’Union fait la force(Eendracht maakt macht) en de Leopoldsorde. ‘Reconnaissance à L’Amérique’ staat in een boog over het wapen heen, de jaartallen 1914-1915 en de naam van de gemeente ‘Hasselt‘. De meelzak is opengevouwen en omrand met koord in de kleuren rood, geel, zwart. In het midden is een kunstige strik aangebracht met rood, geel, zwart band.
Angèle Veltkamp was lid van ‘L’Œuvre des enfants débiles’, een onder-comité van het Comité provincial de Secours et d’Alimentation de Limbourg. Het comité, gevestigd in Rue Vieille, no. 19, Hasselt, ging gezamenlijk op de foto:

Groepsfoto van ‘L’Œuvre des enfants débiles’ in Hasselt. Een van de meisjes op de foto is Angèle Veltkamp. Foto: A. Laskiewicz; coll. Het Stadsmus, Hasselt

Angèle Veltkamp huwde na de oorlog, op 27 september 1919, te Elen met Maurice Schuermans (Sint-Gillis 17.02.1889 – Luik 22.01.1976); hij was luchtvaartingenieur. Ze kregen een dochter Suzanne Schuermans (Angleur 28.04.1920 – Pau, F, 02.02.2018); zij trouwde met Damien Loustau (Havana, Cuba, 08.10.1908 – Pau, F, 04.10.1968).

Versierde meelzak ‘Pawnee County’; borduurwerk Orphanage Hoesselt. Coll. en foto: KSHS

– Het ‘Orphanage’ (weeshuis) in Hoeselt borduurde een zijde van een meelzak afkomstig van inwoners van Pawnee County. Ze knipten het doek in stroken en zetten er een brede rand kloskant tussen en omheen. De geborduurde tekst luidde: ‘From Pawnee County 1000 sacks Flour 1914 donated 1915 to Belgium Sufferers Remembrance Orphanage Hoesselt Kansas U.S.A.‘ Oorspronkelijk bestond de meelzak uit twee zijden met de bedrukking: Keystone Milling Co., Kansas (recto) en Pawnee County (verso).

Onbewerkte meelzak ‘Keystone Milling Co./Pawnee County’. Coll en foto: Musée de la Vie wallonne #5058645

– Het Orphelinat St. Joseph van de Réligieuses de la Providence (Weeshuis St. Jozef van de Zusters van de Voorzienigheid) in Hoeselt borduurden een meelzak van maalderij D. Gerster, Burlington met de merknamen ‘Excelsior-Water Mill-Victor‘. Een banier droeg de tekst ‘Dieu bénisse nos Bienfaiteurs’ (God zegene onze weldoeners). De vlaggen van België, Frankrijk en de VS werden toegevoegd. Lijnen in rood, geel, zwart omrandden de meelzak.

Versierde meelzak ‘Victor’ D. Gerster, Burlington; borduurwerk Orphelinat, Hoesselt. Coll. en foto: KSHS
Versierde meelzak ‘Kaw Flour’, Kaw Milling Co. (verso); borduurwerk Gabriëlle Tournier, Lommel. Coll. en foto: KSHS

Gabriëlle Tournier (Lommel 17.03.1898 – Hasselt 13.06.1971) in Lommel was 17 jaar in 1915. Zij transformeerde een meelzak van Kaw Milling Co., Topeka, tot kussenovertrek met rood, geel, zwart, gestrikt band en omranding van goudgeel koord. De van origine tweezijdig bedrukte meelzak heeft aan een zijde de merknaam ‘Perfection Flour‘ met afbeelding van een arend met open vleugels en graanhalmen tussen de poten.

Versierde meelzak ‘Kaw Flour’, Kaw Milling Co. (recto); borduurwerk Gabriëlle Tournier, Lommel. Coll. en foto: KSHS

De andere zijde draagt een kleinere vogel als beeldmerk. Die is geborduurd in blauw en wit omrand door graanhalmen. Daaronder een appliqué met geborduurde Belgische vlag en ‘L’Union fait la Force‘. De merknaam ‘Kaw’ verwijst naar de rivier de Kaw, ook wel ‘Kansas river’.
Gabriëlle Tournier huwde met Joseph Clercx (Neerpelt 23.02.1894 – Hasselt 26.06.1991), Oud-strijder 1914-1918; Oorlogskruis 1914-1918. Zij kregen zes kinderen, twee dochters en vier zonen.

Versierde meelzak van Imboden Milling Co.; borduurwerk Maria Moonen, Neerpelt. Coll. en foto: KSHS

– In Neerpelt is een meelzak van maalderij Imboden Milling Company, Wichita, geborduurd door Maria Moonen met tekst ‘Merci à l’Amérique‘ met de Belgische en Amerikaanse vlag en een strik in rood, geel, zwart. Band in de kleuren van de Amerikaanse vlag is door de stof geweven. De zak is omrand met een een brede rand kloskant.

Versierde meelzak Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa (recto); borduurwerk Madame Jean Noots (?). Coll. en foto: KSHS

– Een meelzak van Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa, is geborduurd door een onbekende borduurster (Madame Jean Noots?). Alle gedrukte letters en het beeldmerk zijn over geborduurd in kleuren rood, geel, zwart, met blauw en goud. De zak is van origine tweezijdig bedrukt.

Versierde meelzak Kiowa Milling Co., Prop’s, Kiowa (verso); borduurwerk Madame Jean Noots (?). Coll. en foto: KSHS

De bewerkster van de meelzak heeft de randen afgewerkt met goudkleurig band met franje, vastgezet met garens in rood, geel, zwart.

 

 

5. Rotterdam – Londen – New York, najaar 1915
Een serie versierde meelzakken, waaronder de bovenomschreven Limburgse borduurwerken, is in het najaar 1915 als geschenk gegeven als dank voor de voedselhulp aan vertegenwoordigers van de CRB. De versierde meelzakken zijn vervoerd van Brussel naar Rotterdam en vandaar naar het CRB-kantoor in Londen.

Stella Stubbs, née Hostetler, echtgenote ex-gov. W.R. Stubbs. Foto: online

Daar heeft Millard K. Shaler, secretaris van de CRB, opdracht gegeven zeven Kansas-meelzakken aan ex-gov. Stubbs van het Kansas Belgian Relief Fund in Topeka toe te sturen en voegde er een bedankbrief bij.

The Topeka Daily Capital, 6 februari 1916

6. New York – Topeka, Kansas, januari, februari 1916
In februari 1916 arriveerden de zeven versierde Kansas-meelzakken via de heer Stubbs bij secretaris Dillon van het Kansas Belgian Relief Fund in Topeka. Op 6 februari verscheen een artikel in The Topeka Daily Capital onder de kop ‘Belgian Children Embroider Flour Sacks from Kansas’, met een foto van vier van de zeven meelzakken. Het onderschrift luidde ‘Kansas Flour Sacks Embroidered by Appreciative Belgians Whose Lives Were Saved by the Generosity of Charitable Kansans’. (‘Kansas-meelzakken geborduurd door dankbare Belgen wier levens werden gered door de vrijgevigheid van liefdadige mensen uit Kansas).

Advertentie noemt de tentoonstelling van meelzakken in de etalage van de The Mills Stores Company. The Topeka Daily State Journal, 7 februari 1916

De versierde meelzakken werden direct voor het publiek tentoongesteld in een winkeletalage in het centrum van de stad. Daarna gingen ze over naar het ‘State Historical building’ in Topeka om te worden bewaard ‘als blijvend aandenken aan de grote Europese oorlog en het aandeel van Kansas in de hulpverlening aan de Belgen’.

Collectie van zeven versierde meelzakken in het Kansas Museum of History. Foto’s: KSHS; collage Annelien van Kempen

7. Topeka, Kansas, – 2020 –
Tegenwoordig bevinden de zeven versierde meelzakken zich in het Kansas History Museum van de Kansas Historical Society. Deze kreeg destijds de meelzakken geschonken van het Kansas Belgian Relief Fund.

Stadsmus Hasselt, ‘Geen nieuws, goed nieuws!? Hasselaren en de Eerste Wereldoorlog’, februari 2015. Foto: website Sint Willibrordus school, Eisden-Maasmechelen

In 2014 keerde de geborduurde meelzak van Riley County, geborduurd door Angèle Veltkamp voor de gemeente Hasselt, tijdelijk terug in Hasselt. Het Kansas History Museum leende het aandenken uit aan het ‘Stadsmus’, het stadsmuseum van Hasselt voor de tijdelijke expo ‘Geen nieuws, goed nieuws!? Hasselaren en de Eerste Wereldoorlog‘ in 2014-2015. [1]

Daardoor ging deze versierde meelzak 100 jaar later nogmaals, maar wel rechtstreeks, ‘Retour Kansas-Limburg’.

Retour Kansas-Limburg in 7 etappes. Ontwerp tijdlijn: Annelien van Kempen

Speciale dank aan Hubert Bovens, Wilsele, gespecialiseerd in opzoekingen van biografische gegevens van kunstenaars, voor de opzoekingen van de biografische gegevens van de drie Limburgse borduursters Caroline Gielen, Angèle Veltkamp en Gabriëlle Tournier.
Bijzondere dank aan
Michaël Closquet uit Rocourt; hij bezorgde de overlijdensdata van Angèle Veltkamp en haar echtgenoot Maurice Schuermans.

[1] Veronique van Nierop van Het Stadsmus,Hasselt, verstrekte de gegevens van de tijdelijke tentoonstelling en de foto waarop Angèle Veltkamp staat afgebeeld.

 

Thanksgiving Ship ORN sailed from Philadelphia

On Thanksgiving Day 2020, as a thank you to all who inspire, encourage and inform me in my research on the decorated flour sacks, I share the story of the Thanksgiving Ship ORN that sailed from the Philadelphia harbor 106 years ago on November 25, 1914, loaded with sacks of flour on the way to Belgium, as it was waved goodbye by thousands of people, including a special guest: Madame Lalla Vandervelde.

Collecting relief supplies
Immediately after the outbreak of the “European” war in August 1914, spontaneous campaigns arose among the people of Canada and the United States to raise money and goods to help victims of the violence.

Loading the Thelma in the Philadelphia harbor, children also participated in the relief efforts. The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 10, 1914

The relief efforts for the Belgian refugees and the population in occupied Belgium were led by Belgians, living in Canada and the US: the Belgian Consul Pierre Mali, the Consul Generals, businesspeople, prominent private individuals and emigrants, supported in a special way by Madame Lalla Vandervelde, the wife of a Belgian Minister of State, who traveled across the US to draw attention to the Belgian cause and to call for American aid.
Their call was heard by local newspapers and magazines, who with great zeal made urgent appeals to their readers to help out by depositing money in funds specially created for the purpose.

The Thelma’s cargohold full of flour sacks in Philadelphia harbor, The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 11, 1914

The transport of the relief supplies from America to Europe across the Atlantic Ocean had to be done by ship, but that caused a financial headache. This was not the case in Canada, where the government paid for the transportation. But in the US, who would pay for the transportation?

Department store magnate and philanthropist John Wanamaker, Philadelphia. Photo: internet

In the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the immediate response came from department store magnate and philanthropist John Wanamaker (Philadelphia, July 11, 1838 – December 12, 1922). He took initiative and chartered two ships himself to bring relief supplies to Belgium.

Thelma
The first ship chartered by Wanamaker was the steamer Thelma. Loading the ship attracted a lot of interest, the “Philadelphia Inquirer” published about it daily. *)

 

Left the loading of the Thelma in the harbor of Philadelphia, center Captain Hendrickson, right Petrus Verhoeven and his family, Belgian refugees in London. Evening Ledger, November 11, 1914

On Thursday, November 12, 1914, the ship departed after a brief official ceremony at which Mayor Blankenburg of Philadelphia spoke:
My fellow-citizens, twenty-two years ago Philadelphia sent a relief ship-the Indiana-to give aid to the suffering Russian peasants, far away from their own homes. Today Philadelphia is sending another relief ship, the Thelma, this time to the suffering people, the unfortunate people of Belgium. It shows the greatness of the heart of the Philadelphia people. It shows the power of the press, for had it not been for the Philadelphia newspapers I do not believe that this ship would today be ready to sail. The newspapers of Philadelphia did everything in fact to make it possible to send this ship.”
The Girard College Band was on the pier playing the “Star Spangled Banner”.

Food Ship Thelma Off For Belgium, Philadelphia Inquirer, November 13, 1914

The mayor asked the crowds of hundreds of men, women and children to pay tribute to Captain Wolff Hendrickson and his crew with a three-yard “Hooray”. Mr. Francis B. Reeves, Treasurer of the American Red Cross, on behalf of the Red Cross, officially received the relief supplies on the Thelma and Bishop Garland of Philadelphia blessed the ship.

Decorated flour sack Rosabel, embroidered in Roulers / Roeselare, 12 Lbs. Coll. HIA. Photo: E. McMillan

Then Mr. Wanamaker handed a letter to Captain Hendrickson, addressed to Dr. Henry Van Dyke, Minister of the United States in The Hague, Holland: “The steamship Thelma is to carry this to you today … the gifts of the people of Philadelphia and vicinity… The usual papers of the ship will manifest the cargo as of the value of $ 104.000 and it consists wholly of flour, corn meal, beans, canned goods, potatoes in sacks, etc. …  articles of food, because of the statement made by the Honorable Brand Whitlock, Minister at Brussels, a few days ago, regarding the destitution among the women and children and old and sick people in Belgium. …

 

Flour sack ‘A-Flour’, Millbourne Mills. Coll. RAHM, no. 2657, photo: Author

This great old city, that you know so well, the first of the American cities and the first seat of the government of the United States, without neglecting its duties of the poor and suffering in Philadelphia, has risen as it with one heart, to show sympathy and affection, just as the City of Brotherly Love always does, to the world’s sufferers. I may add for your own pleasure that almost enough additional contributions are flowing in to load another ship.”

Advertisement in the Philadelphia Inquirer, November 11, 1914

The Thelma crossed the ocean in three weeks and moored safely on December 3, 1914 with her precious cargo in the Maashaven of Rotterdam. Transhipment started immediately, barges brought the foodstuffs to the intended places via the inland waterways of Holland and Belgium.

Le XXe siècle, December 17, 1914

“Le XXe siècle” reported in mid-December 1914 about the foodstuffs supplied by the Thelma:
“The steamship “Thelma” has arrived in Rotterdam with 1,740 tons of supplies, destined for the Belgians who stayed in Belgium. The load consists of 94,600 sacks and 100 barrels of flour, 1,600 bags of corn flour, 2,000 bags of beans, 1,600 sacks of rice, 1,200 bags of salt, 500 boxes of corn, 5,000 boxes of potatoes, 1,200 bags of barley, 2,500 bags of peas, 600 boxes of condensed milk, 600 boxes preserved peaches, 1,000 boxes of soda salt, 1,200 boxes of plums, 1,000 bags of sugar and 1,250 bags of oatmeal.”[1]

Meanwhile, the second ship chartered by Wanamaker did indeed cross the ocean with the next cargo of relief supplies: the ORN had departed as the Thanksgiving Ship.

Philadelphia Inquirer, November 26, 1914

‘Thanksgiving’ Ship ORN

Philadelphia Inquirer, November 26, 1914

The day before Thanksgiving Day, November 25th, 1914, the steamer ORN left the port of Philadelphia on its way to Rotterdam, as thousands of spectators waved goodbye. The cargo value was $ 173,430, consisting mostly of sacks of flour plus other food items.
The official ceremony to wish the ORN God Speed was attended by many dignitaries. The musical accompaniment was again in hands of The Girard College Band.

 

Lalla Vandervelde. Photo: Mathilde Weil, Philadelphia, 1914. Coll. Library of Congress,

Present were Mayor Blankenberg and his Cabinet with the responsible officials; Mr. Wanamaker and company; M. Paul Hagemans, the Belgian Consul General. Special guest was Madame Lalla Vandervelde.
Also present were the committee of publishers and editors of Philadelphia newspapers, the representatives of the Belgian Government, official and unofficial, the ministers who sanctified the undertaking, and the crew of the ship itself.
The clergymen blessing the Thanksgiving Ship were of three different denominations: Dr. Russell H. Conwell of the Baptist Temple; Very Rev. Henry T. Drumgoole, rector of St. Charles’ Seminary, Overbrook; Rev. Joseph Krauskopf, of Temple Keneseth Israel.
The company of dignitaries first had their picture taken upon arrival on the ship. Madame Vandervelde took an active part in photography: she insisted upon being photographed with a hand camera of her own, placing herself between Mr. Wanamaker and Mayor Blankenburg.

“Thanksgiving Ship Orn Sails”, Philadelphia Inquirer, November 26, 1914

Thanksgiving Day
Mayor Blankenburg presided at the exercises: “I do not believe that Philadelphia could celebrate a greater or better Thanksgiving than by sending this steamer to Belgium, laden to the very limit with all kinds of provisions for its starving people.”

Flour sack ‘Southern Star’, Millbourne Mills. Coll. WHI, Photo: Author

Dr. Krauskopf spoke in part as follows: “… We are assembled on this eve of our National Thanksgiving Day with our hearts both joyful and sorrowful. We are joyful because we are able to share our bounty with those who are in need of it on the other side of the sea, and we are sorrowful because the need has arisen for them, not because of any Divine dispensation, but because of the sinfulness or the error of man.”

Decorated flour sack Rosabel, 1916, 12 Lbs, embroidered, wooden tray with glass. Photo and coll. Sara Leroy, coll. Bebop

Dr. Conwell formally presented the vessel and her cargo to the Red Cross Society. He said in part: “… it is beautiful that we have an opportunity to send out to the suffering Belgians a division of what we have, and if I understand, the spirit of America aright, we would, if we understand their needs, be willing to divide to the last loaf of bread with the Belgians who so bravely defended their homes and showed to the world a most magnificent example of their bravery and patriotism that has ever been known to the history of man.”

Mr. Paul Hagemans accepted the shipment of relief supplies on behalf of Belgium: “For the second time within two weeks, Philadelphia and her charitable people are sending to the Belgian sufferers a shipload of merchandise. In doing so Philadelphia and her people are setting a magnificent example of human solidarity to thousands of my people who will be saved from famine, for we note by the recent reports that conditions are appalling now…. You cannot imagine, therefore, what a ship like this, with its cargo, means to my countrymen…. I thank you, gentlemen of the press, for your efforts on our behalf; and I thank you citizens of Philadelphia for your generous response to our appeal. God speed the Thanksgiving ship.” [2]

In the middle from left to right John Wanamaker, Lalla Vandervelde with the Belgian and American flags, Mayor Blankenburg on board the ORN. Philadelphia Inquirer, November 26, 1914

Madame Vandervelde
Mme. Vandervelde herself brought two small flags, one Belgian and one American, which she carried in her hand. Handing the Belgian red, yellow, black to Mr. Wanamaker, Mme. Vandervelde said:

Flour sack Rosabel, embroidered. Coll. Frankie van Rossem, photo: Author

I want to present this flag of Belgium to Mr. Wanamaker in thanks for his most beautiful gift to Belgium. I want to present to him first this Belgian flag. It is a symbol of the heroism and the courage of a small country fighting against most awful odds. It is a symbol also of the distress of millions of her people”.
Turning again to Mr. Wanamaker Mme. Vandervelde concluded: “I want to present you with this American flag, which is always the symbol of what we love in the life of freedom, and liberty and independence. This flag is also at the present moment a symbol of the generosity and the goodwill of thousands of men, women and children, and I have the greatest pleasure in thanking Mr. Wanamaker for all he has done and in presenting him with these two flags.”

As Mr. Wanamaker, taking the two flags, held them high in the air, the band leader made a signal to his men, and the full brasses sounded the opening strains of the American National Anthem. When this had been sung by the thousands of spectators, present on the quay, Father Drumgoole pronounced the benediction.
The guests left the ORN and the vessel pulled out from the dock.

Flour sack ‘Jack Rabbit’. Coll. WHI, photo: Author

John Wanamaker left the ship as soon as he had cast off her headline – an operation which he insisted on performing himself; he had gone back to his offices in his private automobile. On learning there that the ship had been delayed- her papers at the Custom House not being quite ready – he returned in a delivery automobile from the Wanamaker stores for a last look at the vessel whose departure he had made possible.

On December 18th, 1914, the ORN arrived safely with its valuable cargo in the Maashaven in Rotterdam. The relief supplies were directly transferred to inland vessels and further distributed in Belgium.

Flour sack “Hed-Ov-All”, Buffalo Flour Milling Co.; 1914-1915, Anderlecht, embroidered by Hélène Coumans, age 16, Auderghem; through the intervention of Mme Buelens. Coll. HIA, photo: coll. Author

Decorated flour sacks from Pennsylvania 

Flour sack Rosabel, cushion cover, embroidered, “La Belgique Reconnaissante”, ribbon, diam. 25 cm. Coll. HIA, photo: coll. Author

Flour sacks transported on the THELMA and ORN would have come from mills in the state of Pennsylvania. My research shows that several dozen of these unprocessed and decorated flour sacks have been preserved in Belgium and the US. It is remarkable that all bags have a small size, the stated content measure is 12¼ LBS (5.5 kg flour) to 24½ LBS (11 kg flour). The usual size of flour sacks was 49 or 98 LBS.

 

There are flour sacks of:

Flour Sack ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co. Coll. RAHM, no. 2658, photo: Author

– Buffalo Flour Milling Co in Lewisburg, brand name Hed-Ov-All in the collections of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum, Western Branch, Iowa (HHPLM); Hoover Institution Archives, Stanford University, California (HIA); War Heritage Institute, Brussels (WHI); Royal Art & History Museum, Brussels (RAHM);
– An unknown mill delivered a sack with brand name Jack Rabbit, shown in the WHI;
Millbourne Mills in Philadelphia, brand names Rosabel, A-flour, Southern Star in the collections of HHPLM, HIA, WHI, RAHM and several Belgian private collections;
– Miner-Hillard Milling Co. in Wilkes-Barre, brand name M-H 1795 in the collections of WHI and the MoMu Antwerp.

Meelzak ‘M-H 1795’, Miner-Hillard Milling Co., verso. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Meelzak ‘M-H 1795’, Miner-Hillard Milling Co., recto. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Flour sack “M-H 1795”, Miner-Hillard Milling Co. Apron, embroidered. Coll. MoMu, photo: Europeana

Knowing that these decorated flour sacks left Philadelphia around Thanksgiving Day 1914 adds extra color to my day!

Flour Sack ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co. in a display case in the exhibit hall. Coll. HHPLM, foto: E.McMillan

Special thanks to Marcus Eckhardt, curator of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum, who made me aware of Thanksgiving Day, the national holiday in the US, celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November, this year on November 26th. He called it a time to reflect on the past year and all one is thankful for; our long-distance friendship is one of them. We both look forward to meeting in person, when the circumstances allow. 

 

Flour sack ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co., embroidery, lace. Coll. HHPLM, nr. 62.4.363. Photo: E.McMillan

*) Philadelphia Inquirer, editions November 10,11,12,13,17, 21, 24, 26, 1914

[1] Le XXe siecle: journal d’union et d’action catholique, December 17, 1914

[2] Hagemans, Paul, unpublished biography, Philadelphia, Penn, undated. Mentioned in Carole Austin’s bibliography, From Aid to Art, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987

‘Thanksgiving’-schip ORN vertrok uit Philadelphia

Op deze Thanksgiving Day 2020 vertel ik als dank aan allen die mij inspireren, aanmoedigen en van informatie voorzien bij mijn onderzoek naar de versierde meelzakken het verhaal van het ‘Thanksgiving’-schip ORN dat 106 jaar geleden op 25 november 1914  de havenstad Philadelphia uitvoer, volgeladen met zakken meel op weg naar België, uitgezwaaid door duizenden mensen waaronder een speciale gaste: Madame Lalla Vandervelde.

Inzameling van hulpgoederen
Direct na het uitbreken van de ‘Europese’ oorlog in augustus 1914 ontstonden spontane acties onder de bevolking van Canada en de Verenigde Staten om geld en goederen in te zamelen voor de hulp aan slachtoffers van het geweld.

Het laden van de Thelma in de haven van Philadelphia, ook de kinderen deden mee aan de hulpacties. The Philadelphia Inquirer, 10 november 1914

De acties voor hulp aan de Belgische vluchtelingen en de bevolking in het bezet België stonden onder leiding van Belgen, woonachtig in Canada en de VS: de Belgische Consul Pierre Mali, de Consul-Generaals, zakenmensen, vooraanstaande particulieren en emigranten, op bijzondere wijze ondersteund door Madame Lalla Vandervelde, de vrouw van de Belgische minister van Staat, die door de VS reisde om aandacht te vragen voor de Belgische goede zaak en op te roepen tot Amerikaanse hulpverlening.

Zij vonden gehoor bij lokale dagbladen en tijdschriften, die met grote ijver dringende oproepen aan hun lezers deden om hulp te bieden door geld te storten in speciaal voor het doel opgerichte fondsen.

Het laadruim vol meelzakken van de Thelma in de haven van Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11 november 1914

Het transport van de hulpgoederen van Amerika naar Europa over de Atlantische Oceaan moest per schip gebeuren, maar dat leverde qua kosten hoofdbrekens op. Niet in Canada, waar de overheid de betaling van het transport voor haar rekening nam. Wel in de VS, want wie wilde dat betalen?

Warenhuismagnaat en filantroop John Wanamaker, Philadelphia. Foto: internet

In de stad Philadelphia, Pennsylvanië, kwam het onmiddellijke antwoord van warenhuismagnaat en filantroop John Wanamaker (Philadelphia 11.07.1838-12.12.1922). Hij nam het initiatief en charterde zelf twee schepen om hulpgoederen naar België te brengen.

Thelma
Het eerste schip gecharterd door Wanamaker was het stoomschip Thelma. Het laden van het schip trok veel belangstelling, de ‘Philadelphia Inquierer’ publiceerde er dagelijks over. *)

Links het laden van de Thelma in de haven van Philadelphia, midden kapitein Hendrickson, rechts Petrus Verhoeven en zijn gezin, Belgische vluchtelingen in Londen. Evening Ledger, 11 november 1914

Op donderdag 12 november 1914 vertrok het schip na een korte officiële plechtigheid waar burgemeester Blankenburg van Philadelphia het woord voerde:
“Medeburgers, tweeëntwintig jaar geleden stuurde Philadelphia een hulpschip, de Indiana, om hulp te bieden aan de lijdende Russische boeren, ver weg van eigen haard en huis. Vandaag stuurt Philadelphia opnieuw een hulpschip, de Thelma, dit keer naar de lijdende mensen, de ongelukkige mensen van België. Het toont de grootsheid van hart van de bewoners van Philadelphia. Het toont de kracht van de dagbladpers, want als de kranten in Philadelphia er niet waren geweest, geloof ik niet dat dit schip vandaag klaar zou zijn om te vertrekken. De dagbladen van Philadelphia hebben er alles aan gedaan om dit schip met hulpgoederen te kunnen laten vertrekken.”
De Girard College band stond op de pier en speelde de ‘Star Spangled Banner’.

Voedsel schip Thelma vertrekt naar België, Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 november 1914

De burgemeester vroeg aan het toegestroomde publiek van honderden mannen, vrouwen en kinderen hulde te brengen aan kapitein Wolff Hendrickson en bemanning middels een driewerf ‘Hoera’. De heer Francis B. Reeves, penningmeester van het Amerikaanse Rode Kruis, nam namens het Rode Kruis de hulpgoederen op de Thelma in ontvangst en bisschop Garland van Philadelphia zegende het schip.

Versierde meelzak Rosabel, geborduurd in Roulers/Roeselare, 12 Lbs. Coll. HIA. Foto: E. McMillan

Daarna overhandigde de heer Wanamaker aan kapitein Hendrickson een brief, gericht aan Dr. Henry Van Dyke, gezant van de Verenigde Staten in Den Haag, Holland: ‘Het stoomschip Thelma vervoert vandaag naar u … de geschenken van de inwoners van Philadelphia en omgeving … De officiële documenten van het schip zullen aantonen dat de lading met een waarde van $ 104.000 volledig bestaat uit meel, maïsmeel, bonen, ingeblikte voedingsmiddelen, zakken aardappelen, enz … allemaal levensmiddelen zoals gevraagd in de verklaring van enkele dagen geleden van de heer Brand Whitlock, gezant in Brussel, die sprak over de grote behoefte aan hulp voor vrouwen en kinderen en oude en zieke mensen in België. …

Meelzak ‘A-Flour’, Millbourne Mills. Coll. KMKG, nr. 2657, foto: auteur

Deze voorname oude stad, die u zo goed kent, de eerste van de Amerikaanse steden en de eerste zetel van de regering van de Verenigde Staten, is – zonder haar plichten ten aanzien van de armen en behoeftigen in Philadelphia te verwaarlozen- als één man opgestaan om medeleven en genegenheid te tonen aan behoeftigen in de wereld, zoals ‘de Stad van Broeder Liefde’ altijd doet.
Ik voeg er voor uw eigen genoegdoening aan toe dat er al bijna voldoende giften zijn binnengestroomd om een volgend schip te laden.’

Advertentie in the Philadelphia Inquirer, 11 november 1914

De Thelma stak de oceaan over in drie weken tijd en meerde op 3 december 1914 met haar kostbare lading veilig aan in de Maashaven van Rotterdam. Het overladen begon direct, aken brachten via de binnenwateren van Holland en België de voedingsmiddelen naar de bestemde plekken.

Le XXe siecle, 17 december 1914

‘Le XXe siècle’ berichtte half december 1914 over de voedingsmiddelen die de Thelma aanvoerdde:
Het stoomschip “Thelma” is in Rotterdam aangekomen met 1.740 ton aan voorraden, bestemd voor de Belgen die in België bleven. De lading bestaat uit 94.600 zakken en 100 vaten meel, 1.600 zakken maïsmeel, 2.000 zakken bonen, 1.600 zakken rijst, 1.200 zakken zout, 500 dozen maïs, 5.000 dozen aardappelen, 1.200 zakken gerst, 2.500 zakken erwten, 600 dozen gecondenseerde melk, 600 dozen geconserveerde perziken, 1.000 kisten sodazout, 1.200 kisten pruimen, 1.000 zakken suiker en 1.250 zakken havermout.’[1]

Inmiddels voer het tweede door Wanamaker gecharterde schip inderdaad met de volgende lading hulpgoederen de oceaan over: de ORN was vertrokken als ‘Thanksgiving’-schip.

Philadelphia Inquirer 26 november 1914

‘Thanksgiving’-schip ORN

Philadelphia Inquirer 26 november 1914

De dag voor Thanksgiving Day, 25 november 1914, vertrok het stoomschip ORN uit de haven van Philadelphia op weg naar Rotterdam, uitgezwaaid door duizenden toeschouwers. De waarde van de lading was $ 173.430 en bestond vooral uit zakken meel plus andere voedingsmiddelen.

De officiële plechtigheid om de ORN behouden vaart te wensen werd bijgewoond door vele hoogwaardigheidsbekleders. Ook nu was de muzikale begeleiding van The Girard College Band.

Lalla Vandervelde. Foto: Mathilde Weil, Philadelphia, 1914. Coll. Library of Congress

Aanwezig waren burgemeester Blankenberg en zijn wethouders met de verantwoordelijke ambtenaren; de heer Wanamaker met collega’s; de Belgische consul-generaal Paul Hagemans. Speciale gaste was Madame Lalla Vandervelde.
Ook aanwezig waren de directies en redacties van de kranten en hun uitgeverijen. De voorgangers in de plechtigheid waren van drie verschillende gezindten: Dr. Russell H. Conwell van de Doopsgezinde kerk; Eerwaarde Henry T. Drumgoole, rector van het St. Charles’ Seminarie, Overbrook; Eerwaarde Joseph Krauskopf, rabbijn van de synagoge ‘Keneseth Israel’.
Het gezelschap hoogwaardigheidsbekleders ging bij aankomst op het schip allereerst op de foto. Ook Madame Vandervelde nam actief deel aan de fotografie: ze stond erop dat ze met haar eigen camera gefotografeerd zou worden, staande tussen de heer Wanamaker en burgemeester Blankenburg.

‘Thanksgiving Ship Orn Sails’, Philadelphia Inquirer 26 november 1914

Thanksgiving Day
De burgemeester sprak de menigte toe: “Ik geloof niet dat Philadelphia een mooiere of betere Thanksgiving zou kunnen vieren dan door dit stoomschip naar België te sturen, tot het uiterste beladen met voedingsmiddelen voor de uitgehongerde bevolking.

Meelzak ‘Southern Star’, Millbourne Mills. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

Rabbijn Krauskopf kreeg het woord: “… We zijn op de vooravond van onze nationale Thanksgiving-dag bijeengekomen met zowel een vreugdevol als bedroefd hart. We zijn verheugd omdat we in staat zijn onze overvloed te delen met degenen die het nodig hebben aan de andere kant van de oceaan. We zijn bedroefd omdat de behoeften van hen zijn ontstaan door de zondigheid en de dwalingen van de mens.”

Versierde meelzak Rosabel, 1916, 12 Lbs, geborduurd, houten theeblad met glas. Foto en coll. Sara Leroy, coll. Bebop

Dr. Conwell sprak: “… het is prachtig dat we de kans hebben om naar de noodlijdende Belgen een deel te sturen van datgene wat wij hebben, en als ik de geest van Amerika goed begrijp, zouden we, als we hun behoeften kennen, bereid zijn om ons laatste brood te delen met de Belgen, zij die zo dapper hun huizen verdedigden en de wereld een prachtig voorbeeld toonden van hun moed en patriottisme …”
Consul-Generaal Paul Hagemans aanvaardde de scheepslading hulpgoederen namens België: “Voor de tweede keer binnen twee weken sturen Philadelphia en haar goedgeefse bevolking een scheepslading voedingsmiddelen naar de Belgische slachtoffers. Hiermee geven Philadelphia en haar bevolking een prachtig voorbeeld van menselijke solidariteit met de duizenden van mijn mensen die van de hongersnood zullen worden gered; want we maken uit de recente berichten op dat de omstandigheden er verschrikkelijk zijn…. Behouden vaart aan het Thanksgiving-schip![2]

In het midden vlnr. John Wanamaker, Lalla Vandervelde met de Belgische en Amerikaanse vlaggetjes, burgemeester Blankenburg aan boord van de ORN, Philadelphia Inquirer 26 november 1914

Madame Vandervelde
Toen was de beurt aan Madame Vandervelde. Zij nam twee kleine vlaggen, een Belgische en een Amerikaanse, in haar handen. Ze overhandigde het stokje van de Belgische vlag aan John Wanamaker met de woorden:

Meelzak ‘Rosabel’, geborduurd. Coll. Frankie van Rossem, foto: auteur

“Ik bied deze vlag van België aan de heer Wanamaker aan, als dank voor zijn prachtige geschenk aan België. Ik overhandig eerst deze Belgische vlag als symbool van heldhaftigheid en moed van een klein land dat tegen een verschrikkelijke overmacht vecht. Het staat ook symbool voor de noden van miljoenen van haar mensen.” Vervolgens overhandigde ze hem de kleine Amerikaanse vlag: “Deze Amerikaanse vlag bied ik u aan als het symbool van vrijheid, soevereiniteit en onafhankelijkheid. Deze vlag staat op dit moment ook symbool voor de vrijgevigheid en de sympathie van duizenden mannen, vrouwen en kinderen. Ik heb het grote genoegen de heer Wanamaker dank te zeggen voor alles wat hij heeft gedaan door hem deze twee vlaggen te overhandigen.”

De heer Wanamaker nam de vlaggetjes aan, strekte zijn armen en hield ze hoog in de lucht. Op dit teken zette de band de tonen in van het Amerikaanse volkslied, dat door de duizenden aanwezigen op schip en kade uit volle borst werd meegezongen.
Pater Drumgoole sprak vervolgens de zegen uit over schip en lading, waarna de gasten de ORN verlieten en het schip zich losmaakte van de kade.

Meelzak ‘Jack Rabbit’. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur

John Wanamaker keerde terug naar kantoor, maar kwam direct teruggereden in een van de bestelauto’s van zijn Wanamaker’s warenhuizen; hij volgde op de pier tot het laatste moment het tweede schip met hulpgoederen waarvan hij de reis had mogelijk gemaakt.

Op 18 december 1914 arriveerde ook de ORN met haar kostbare lading veilig in de Maashaven in Rotterdam. De hulpgoederen werden direct overgeladen in binnenvaartschepen en verder gedistribueerd in België.

 

Meelzak ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co., 1914-1915, Anderlecht, geborduurd door Hélène Coumans, 16 jaar, Auderghem; door tussenkomst van Mme Buelens. Coll. HIA, foto: coll. auteur

Versierde meelzakken uit Pennsylvanië

Meelzak Rosabel, kussenhoes, geborduurd, ‘La Belgique Reconnaissante’, lint, diam. 25 cm. Coll. HIA, foto: coll. auteur

Meelzakken, vervoerd op de THELMA en ORN, zullen afkomstig zijn geweest van maalderijen in de staat Pennsylvanië. Mijn onderzoek laat zien dat enkele tientallen van deze onbewerkte en versierde meelzakken bewaard zijn gebleven in België en de VS. Opmerkelijk is dat alle zakken een klein formaat hebben, de vermelde inhoudsmaat is 12¼ LBS (5,5 kg meel) tot 24½ LBS (11 kg meel). De gebruikelijke maat van meelzakken is 49 of 98 LBS.

Er zijn meelzakken van:

Meelzak ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co. Coll. KMKG, nr. 2658, foto: auteur

– Buffalo Flour Milling Co in Lewisburg, merknaam Hed-Ov-All in de collecties van de Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum, West-Branch, Iowa (HHPLM); Hoover Institution Archives, Stanford University, Californië (HIA); Koninklijk Legermuseum, Brussel (WHI); Koninklijk Museum Kunst & Geschiedenis, Brussel (KMKG).
– Een mij onbekende maalderij leverde een zak met merknaam Jack Rabbit, getoond in het WHI.
Millbourne Mills in Philadelphia, merknamen Rosabel, A-flour, Southern Star in de collecties van HHPLM, HIA, WHI, KMKG en meerdere Belgische particuliere collecties;
– Miner-Hillard Milling Co. in Wilkes-Barre, merknaam M-H 1795 in de collecties van WHI en het ModeMuseum Antwerpen.

Meelzak ‘M-H 1795’, Miner-Hillard Milling Co., verso. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Meelzak ‘M-H 1795’, Miner-Hillard Milling Co., recto. Coll. WHI, foto: auteur
Meelzak ‘M-H 1795’, Miner-Hillard Milling Co. Schortje, geborduurd. Coll. MoMu, foto: Europeana

Te weten dat deze versierde meelzakken uit Philadelphia vertrokken zijn rondom Thanksgiving Day 1914 geeft vandaag extra kleur aan mijn dag!

Meelzak ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co., in de museumopstelling. Coll. HHPLM, foto: E.McMillan

Speciale dank aan Marcus Eckhardt, conservator van het Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum, hij maakte me attent op Thanksgiving Day, de nationale feestdag in de VS, gevierd op de vierde donderdag in november, dit jaar op 26 november. Hij noemde het een tijd van reflectie over het afgelopen jaar en alles waar je dankbaar voor bent, onze lange afstand vriendschap is er een van. We zien er beiden naar uit elkaar in het echt te ontmoeten, wanneer de omstandigheden dit zullen toelaten.

Meelzak ‘Hed-Ov-All’, Buffalo Flour Milling Co., geborduurd, kant. Coll. HHPLM, nr. 62.4.363, foto: E.McMillan

*) Philadelphia Inquirer, edities 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 21, 24, 26 november 1914

[1] Le XXe siecle: journal d’union et d’action catholique, 17 december 1914

[2] Hagemans, Paul, niet gepubliceerde biografie, Philadelphia, Penn, ongedateerd. Vermeld in de bibliografie van Carole Austin, From Aid to Art, San Francisco Folk Art Museum, 1987

The “Ouvroir” of Antwerp (2)

In the Facebook group “Lizerne Trench Art” (LTA), a lively theme night on “WWI flour sacks” was created as a result of the blog “The Ouvroir of Antwerp (1)“.

The Facebook group LTA resides in West Flanders, Belgium; they are a study group, a forum of friends, intended to exchange information/research about all forms of trench art, engraved shell casings, painted military equipment, embroidery, prisoner of war art, woodcarving, etc. from WWI until now.

On Friday evening, October 30th, 2020, I asked the members of the group if they knew about decorated WWI flour sacks that read “Ouvroir d’Anvers”. I immediately received a positive response from Ingo Luypaert.

Tray flour sack “American Commission” / “Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917”, embroidered. Coll. and photo: Ingo Luypaert

Tray ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’

Bottom of tray with flour sack “American Commission” / “Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917”. Coll. and photo: Ingo Luypaert

As it turns out, Ingo Luypaert owns a beautiful embroidered flour sack “American Commission”.
The flour sack is inlaid in a wooden tray covered with glass.
The embroidery shows the Belgian coat of arms with the standing lion, above it a golden crown.

The crowned coat of arms of Belgium, arabesques and text “Ouvroir d’Anvers”. Coll. and photo: Ingo Luypaert
Detail embroidered arabesque in red, yellow, black. Coll. and photo: Ingo Luypaert

The heraldry is surrounded by “arabesques”: rhythmic patterns, repetitive movement lines, executed in the embroidery as an elegant pleated ribbon in the colors red, yellow, black with the text “Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917” underneath. The silk threads make the embroidery shine.

 

<< Exhibition of flour sacks >>

The tray may have been exhibited and purchased in March 1916 to contribute to charity. Two newspapers published outside Belgium reported on an exhibition in Antwerp in the halls of the Harmonie Maatschappij, the building where the Ouvroir was located.

Summer Hall of the Société Royale d’Harmonie, Antwerp, postcard. Photo: internet

“ANTWERP
<<Exhibition of “flour sacks” >>.

De stem uit België (The voice from Belgium), March 31, 1916

In Antwerp and Brussels, exhibitions were set up for “flour sacks” for a few days.
These original exhibitions are the result of the intention of the Belgian women who for some time now have embellished with embroidery some of the sacks in which the flour, delivered by the American relief organizations, arrives in occupied Belgium.
Among the most successful and most admired decorations were noted: the Belgian and American banners surrounded by ornate arabesques; …

 

“De Harmonie”, Antwerp, postcard. Photo: internet

The Germans inspected the rooms of the Harmonie Maatschappij, obviously uncomfortable with the fact that the starvation of Belgium under German rule and the protective actions of a neutral country should become a matter of public disclosure. They apply “censorship” to the sacks and ordered several ones they deemed too patriotic to be removed.”
(De stem uit België (The voice from Belgium), March 31, 1916; De Belgische standaard (The Belgian standard), April 8, 1916)
 

Detail embroidered arabesque in red, yellow, black; 1917. Coll. and photo: Ingo Luypaert

My thanks go to the Lizerne Trench Art-Facebook group, in particular to Ingo Luypaert.
Through his beautiful embroidered flour sack “American Commission”, the work of the girls and women in the Ouvroir of Antwerp during the occupation of 14-18 came back to life.

I look forward to the discovery of more decorated flour sacks with the text ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’!

 

Recommended reading:
* My article De weldaad van de meelzak/Flour sacks. The art of charity” has been published in the 2020 Yearbook of the In Flanders Fields Museum, Ypres.
You’ll find the article in Dutch: p. 4-25; in English: p. 123-131.

* Marc Dejonckheere interviewed me for VIFF Magazine, magazine of The Friends of the In Flanders Fields Museum; The emotions of the flour sack” was published in September 2019.
You can read the article here.

 

Het ‘Ouvroir’ van Antwerpen (2)

In de Facebookgroep ‘Lizerne Trench Art’ (LTA) is een levendige thema-avond ‘WWI-meelzakken’ ontstaan naar aanleiding van het blog ‘Het Ouvroir van Antwerpen (1)’.

De Facebookgroep LTA met zetel in West-Vlaanderen, België, is een studiegroep, vriendenforum, bedoeld om informatie/onderzoek uit te wisselen voor alle vormen van loopgraafkunst, gegraveerde hulzen, beschilderde militaire uitrusting, borduurwerkjes, krijgsgevangenenkunst, houtsnijwerk, enz. van WO I tot nu.
Het was op vrijdagavond 30 oktober 2020, ik vroeg de leden in de groep of zij misschien meelzakken kenden met de tekst ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’. Daarop ontving ik onmiddellijk positieve reactie van Ingo Luypaert.

Thee/dienblad meelzak ‘American Commission’/’Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917’, geborduurd. Coll. en foto: Ingo Luypaert

Thee/dienblad ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’

Onderzijde thee/dienblad meelzak ‘American Commission’/’Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917’. Coll. en foto: Ingo Luypaert

Ingo Luypaert blijkt een prachtige geborduurde meelzak ‘American Commission’ te bezitten.
De meelzak is ingelegd in een houten thee/dienblad onder glas.
Het borduurwerk toont het wapen van België met de staande leeuw, daarboven een gouden kroon.

Het gekroonde wapen van België, arabesken en tekst ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’. Coll. en foto: Ingo Luypaert
Detail geborduurde arabesk in de kleuren rood, geel, zwart. Coll. en foto: Ingo Luypaert

De heraldiek is omringd door ‘arabesken’: ritmisch patronen, repeterende bewegingslijnen, uitgevoerd in het borduurwerk als sierlijk geplooid lint in de kleuren rood, geel, zwart met daaronder de tekst ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers 1914-1917’. De zijden garens doen het borduurwerk glanzen.

<<Tentoonstelling van bloemzakken>>
Mogelijk is het dienblad in maart 1916 tentoongesteld geweest en aangekocht ten behoeve van bijdragen aan het goede doel. Twee kranten die buiten België verschenen, berichtten over een tentoonstelling in Antwerpen in de zalen van de Harmonie Maatschappij, het gebouw waar het Ouvroir gevestigd was.

Zomerlokaal der Koninklijke Harmonie, Antwerpen, postkaart. Foto: internet

‘ANTWERPEN
<<Tentoonstelling van “bloemzakken”>>.

De stem uit België, 31 maart 1916

In Antwerpen en in Brussel werden voor enkele dagen tentoonstellingen ingericht voor “bloemzakken”.
Deze oorspronkelijke tentoonstellingen zijn het gevolg van het voornemen door de Belgische vrouwen voor eenigen tijd opgevat om eenige der zakken, waarin de bloem door het Amerikaansch steunbereik tot bevoorrading bezorgd, in bezet België aankomt, met borduurwerk te versieren.
Onder de best gelukte en meest bewonderde versieringen werden opgemerkt: de Belgische en Amerikaansche vaandels met sierlijke arabesken omringd; …

De Harmonie, Antwerpen, postkaart. Foto: internet

Te Antwerpen in de zalen van de Harmonie Maatschappij kwamen de Duitschers kijken, die het natuurlijk niet prettig vinden dat aldus de uithongering van België onder Duitsch bewind en het beschermend optreden van een onzijdig land wordt openbaar gemaakt.
Zij oefenen “censuur” uit op de zakken en verscheidenen exemplaren die hun te vaderlandslievend voorkwamen werden weggenomen …’
(De stem uit België, 31 maart 1916; De Belgische standaard, 8 april 1916)

Detail geborduurde arabesk in de kleuren rood, geel, zwart; 1917. Coll. en foto: Ingo Luypaert

Dank aan de Lizerne Trench Art-Facebook-groep, in het bijzonder aan Ingo Luypaert. Via zijn prachtige geborduurde meelzak ‘American Commission’ kwam het werk van de meisjes en vrouwen in het Ouvroir van Antwerpen tijdens de bezetting van ’14-’18, wederom tot leven.

Ik zie uit naar de ontdekking van méér versierde meelzakken met tekst ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’!

Vervolg
Een derde blog over de meelzak ‘Haan op eikentak in ochtendgloren’ ontworpen door de Belgische kunstenaar Piet Van Engelen en geborduurd in het Ouvroir d’Anvers publiceerde ik op 17 februari 2021.

 

Aanbevolen literatuur:
* Mijn artikel ‘De weldaad van de meelzak’ (Flour sacks. The art of charity) is gepubliceerd in het Jaarboek 2020 van het In Flanders Fields Museum, Ieper.
Je vindt het artikel in Nederlands op p. 4-25; in Engels: p. 123-131.

* Marc de Jonckheere heeft me geïnterviewd voor VIFF Magazine, het tijdschrift van de Vrienden van het In Flanders Fields Museum; ‘De emotie van de meelzak’ is gepubliceerd in September 2019.
Je leest het hier.

 

The “Ouvroir” of Antwerp (1) – English

The “Ouvroir” of Antwerp employed thousands of girls and women during the occupation of Belgium. Clothing was made and altered, shoes were repaired and flour sacks were embroidered there.

The Ouvroir of Antwerp, iconic overview photo from the gallery, 1915. Photo: “War Bread”

The meaning of an “ouvroir” is: “Lieu réservé aux ouvrages de couture, de broderie…, dans une communauté”; translated: “Place for sewing, embroidery …, in a community”. In a historical context, I would call it a “communal sewing workshop”.

The history of the Ouvroir of Antwerp has become familiar to me through three primary sources: one Belgian and two American.

– “Heures de Détresse” by Edmond Picard, the Belgian primary source shows some photos of the Ouvroir.[2]
– “War Bread” by Edward Eyre Hunt commemorates the Ouvroir of this American delegate of the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) in the province of Antwerp. He was a young journalist and writer; he worked in Antwerp from December 1914 to October 1915.[3]
– “Women of Belgium” by Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman (Grand Island, Nebraska, 1874 – California 08.05.1960). She was also a CRB delegate – unique as the only woman – and stayed in Belgium between July and November 1916. As a writer and activist, she committed herself to the good cause of Belgian women.[4]

Edward Hunt, War Bread
In the autumn of 1914, three women took the initiative to set up a clothing workshop to provide assistance to residents of the city of Antwerp.

  • Laure de Montigny-de Wael (Antwerp 29.11.1869 – Ixelles, Brussels 09.07.1926)
  • Anna Osterrieth-Lippens (Ghent 01.11.1877 – Brussels 14.09.1957)
  • Countess Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem (Ghent 17.12.1857 – Antwerp 21.04.1938)

They headed a committee of ladies who, I assume, had experience in the organization of charities and workhouses. Even before the war, there were numerous private initiatives offering employment and education to young women and assistance to needy people. The committee is said to have bought up all the piece goods it could find in the city and commissioned the Folies Bergères theater to employ hundreds of young women to make and repair clothes.

Rockefeller Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation and the CRB worked together on the relief efforts. Belgian Relief Bulletin, December 5, 1914. Coll. Brussels City Archives. Photo: author

The American Rockefeller Foundation collected clothing in the US and shipped it via the port of Rotterdam to Belgium. Canada also provided clothing transports.
Citation from ‘War Bread’: ‘Before January first, 1915, the Rockefeller Foundation contributed almost a million dollars to the work of Belgian relief, and established a station in Rotterdam called the Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission, to assist the Commission for Relief in Belgium. This station had charge of the sorting and shipping of clothes sent from America for Belgium.
We never had enough to supply them. It was only when the generous gifts of clothing began to come from America through the Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission, that the situation improved at all.”

The Ouvroir was under the protection of the CRB and received a monthly subsidy of 50,000 francs from the city of Antwerp until the Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation (CNSA) took over financing.

International exhibition “d’Art Culinaire & d’Alimentation” in 1899, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Antwerp. Photo: internet

The Ouvroir moved to larger premises: the “Summer Hall” or “Banquet Hall”  of the Société Royale d’Harmonie on Mechelsesteenweg.[5]
The architect Pieter Dens designed the building, completed in 1846. The location had housed concerts, exhibitions and fairs.

The Banquet Hall, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Antwerp, 1906, postcard. Photo: internet

The Ouvroir in Banquet Hall “Harmonie”

Edward Eyre Hunt, photo: “WWI Crusaders”, Jeffrey Miller

Hunt paints this picture of the organization of the Ouvroir: ‘The stage of the Antwerp Harmonie was piled with boxes of goods. Galleries and pit were spread with rows of sewing machines and work tables, and the cloak room was transformed into a steam and sulphur disinfecting bath, where all materials, new and old, were taken apart and thoroughly cleansed. Nine hundred girls and young women worked under supervision in the warm, well-lighted hall, while about three thousand older women were given sewing to do at home.

A group of cobblers in the hall made and repaired shoes. All these workers were paid. From the central workshop, made goods and unmade materials were sent throughout the Province; the latter to sewing circles in the villages and towns.”

Ouvroir of Antwerp, ground floor, 1915. Photo: “Heures de Détresse”
Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman. Photo: internet

Charlotte Kellogg: Women of Belgium
Charlotte Kellogg went to visit the workroom.
“We looked on a sea of golden and brown heads bending over sewing tables. Noble women had rescued them from the wreckage of war—within the shelter of this music-hall they were working for their lives… 1200 girls were preparing the sewing and embroidery materials for 3,300 others working at home. In other words, this was one of the blessed ouvroirs or workrooms of Belgium.
Here the whole attitude toward the clothing is from the point of view, not of the protection it gives, but of the employment it offers. Without this employment, without the daily devotion of the wonderful women who have built up this astonishing organization…. Of course, there is always dire need for the finished garments. They are turned over as fast as they can be to the various other committees that care for the destitute. Between February 1915, and May 1916, articles valued at over 2,000,000 francs were given out in this way through this ouvroir alone.”

Festive photo of full flour sacks from mills in the US and Canada. Photo: “Heures de Détresse”

Transformation of flour sacks
Kellogg did not mention whether flour sacks were transformed into clothing in the Ouvroir, probably not. However, some of the women were involved in embroidery!

The embroidery of the flour sacks in the Ouvroir caught Kellogg’s attention:

Flour sack “ABC”, scenic embroidery, design Piet van Engelen. Dedicated to Mr. Herbert Hoover, Ouvroir d’Anvers. Coll. and photo: HHPLM nr. 62.4.447

“In one whole section the girls do nothing but embroider our American flour sacks. Artists draw designs to represent the gratitude of Belgium to the United States. The one on the easel as we passed through, represented the lion and the cock of Belgium guarding the crown of the king, while the sun—-the great American eagle rises in the East. The sacks that are not sent to America as gifts are sold in Belgium as souvenirs”

The workers’ reward was training in sewing and pattern design; lessons in history, geography, literature, writing and special attention to hygiene, plus a payment of 3 francs per week. Kellogg exulted: “These things are splendid, and with the three francs a week wages, spell self-respect, courage, progress all along the line. The committee has always been able to secure the money for the wages

Ouvroir of Antwerp, gallery, 1915. Photo: “Heures de Détresse”

Countess Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem
Last week I received a message from one of the great-grandsons of Countess Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem, a committee member of the Ouvroir. I had previously come into contact with Mr. van de Werve de Vorsselaer in my research into the maiden name of “Comtesse van de Werve de Vorsselaer” and her involvement in charitable committees. His great-grandmother turned out to have been very active in charity works during the war.

Countess Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer, née Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem. Photo: coll. van de Werve de Vorsselaer

“The Countess van de Werve de Vorsselaer in question was born Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem. She married Count Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer (1851-1920) on April 23, 1877 in Mariakerke. They had two sons.
She was a member of the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, of the Association des Mères Chrétiennes and of L’Hospitalité de Notre-Dame de Lourdes. She was also a Knight of the Order of Leopold II with a silver star and was awarded the Commemorative Medal of the 1914-1918 War (France) and the Victory Medal. She was presented these awards due to her boundless dedication to the war wounded: she had comforted them, eased their pain and cared for them in the halls of the Antwerp Zoo, which for the occasion had been transformed into an improvised military hospital.” [6]

The message I just received from Mr. van de Werve de Vorsselaer contained a surprise. He had talked to his wife about our conversations and she remembered that his mother had given her some decorated flour sacks. To his surprise, three embroidered flour sacks had emerged, the existence of which had been unfamiliar to him.
He was so kind as to send sent me photos of the embroideries.

Embroidered flour sack ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’

‘“Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916”. Flour sack detail in white embroidery techniques. Coll. and photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

Examination of the photos made me jump for joy: one of them was embroidered in white on white: “Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916 “. The original printing of the flour sack is missing, but in size it is the canvas of half a flour sack. Undisputedly a craft that originated at the Ouvroir of Antwerp!

“Flour sack”, tablecloth in white embroidery technique, English embroidery, “Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916”. Coll. and photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

It is a small tablecloth with floral motifs, decorated with scalloped edges throughout, executed in white embroidery techniques, the style resembles English embroidery.

Seeing as one flour sack had originated at the Ouvroir, I assume that the other two embroideries were also created there. These flour sacks have been transformed into cushion covers.

Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia

Flour sack “Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia”, embroidered; Ouvroir of Antwerp. Coll. and photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

The origin of one flour sack is the “Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia”, from the state Pennsylvania. The characters of the original print are embroidered in the colors red, yellow, black and red, white, blue. Some small flags have been added as patriotic decoration, as well as the years 1914-1915-1916-1917. The result is a colorful cushion cover.

American Commission

Detail flour sack “American Commission”, white embroidery technique, Italian embroidery; Ouvroir of Antwerp. Coll. and photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer
Original printing “American Commission”. Coll. Hollaert. Photo: author

One flour sack originates from the “American Commission”. The original print was blue, but that color has faded. This decorated sack also features the white embroidery techniques; it looks like Italian embroidery. The contours of the characters are embroidered with white yarns. Furthermore, the flour sack has been artfully decorated with leaves and flowers.

Finally

Mr. van de Werve de Vorsselaer stated in his explanation accompanying the photos of the flour sacks that he knew of neither the existence nor the background of their collection of decorated flour sacks. He thanked me with: “Grâce à vous, mes enfants et petits-enfants sauront leur provenance.” (“Thanks to you, my children and grandchildren will know their origins.”)

Flour sack “American Commission”, white embroidery technique, Italian embroidery. Ouvroir of Antwerp; cushion cover. Coll. and photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

In turn, I would like to thank Mr. and Mrs. van de Werve de Vorsselaer. My research questions: who embroidered the flour sacks, where did they embroider them, what was their motivation, have received meaningful answers. Thanks to the collection of three embroidered flour sacks, the work of great-grandmother van de Werve de Vorsselaer and of thousands of other girls and women in the Ouvroir of Antwerp came back to life.

For the sequel see the next blog: The “Ouvroir” of Antwerp (2)

 

[1] My thanks go to
– Mr. and Mrs. van de Werve de Vorsselaer for their information and the photos of the decorated flour sacks;
– Hubert Bovens in Wilsele for providing biographical data;
Majo van der Woude of Tree of Needlework in Utrecht for her advice on the various embroidery techniques.

[2] Picard, Edmond, Heures de Détresse. L’Oeuvre du Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation et de la Commission for Relief in Belgium. Belgique 1914 – 1915. Bruxelles: CNSA, L’ Imprimerie J -E Goossens SA, 1915

[3] Hunt, Edward E., War Bread. A Personal Narrative of the War and Relief in Belgium. New York: Henry Holt & Company 1916

[4] Kellogg, Charlotte, Women of Belgium. Turning Tragedy in Triumph. New York and London: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 4th edition, 1917

Banquet Hall of the Société Royale de l’Harmonie, Antwerp, postcard. Photo: internet

5] Hunt confused two locations of the Société Royale de l’Harmonie in “War Bread”: the Summer or Banquet Hall on Mechelsesteenweg in the Harmonie Park, next to the current King Albert Park, and the theater / concert hall in the city center on the Arenbergstraat / Rue d’Arenberg. The Ouvroir was located on Mechelsesteenweg. (Appendix XXIX, The Clothing Workshop, p. 357).

Count Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer. Photo: The chant of paradise. The Antwerp Zoo: 150 years of history

[6] The rooms of the ZOO were made available to the Red Cross in 1914.
Count Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer had been involved in the management of the Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp since 1902 as administrator. In 1919 he became chairman of the board, but died unexpectedly in 1920. It appears both spouses, like many prominent and noble families, had a close relationship with the famous Antwerp Zoo. Baetens, Roland, The chant of paradise. The Antwerp Zoo: 150 years of history. Tielt: Lannoo, 1993

L’Ouvroir d’Anvers (1) – Français

L’Ouvroir d’Anvers employait des milliers de filles et de femmes pendant l’occupation ’14-’18 de la Belgique. Des vêtements y ont été confectionnés et modifiés, des chaussures y ont été réparées et des sacs à farine y ont été brodés.

L’Ouvroir d’Anvers, photo emblématique depuis la galerie, 1915. Photo: «War bread»

La signification d’un «ouvroir» est: «Lieu réservé aux ouvrages de couture, de broderie…, dans une communauté». Dans un contexte historique, j’appellerais cela un “atelier de couture communautaire”.

L’histoire de l’Ouvroir d’Anvers m’est devenue familière grâce à trois sources principales: une belge et deux américaines.
– «Heures de Détresse» d’Edmond Picard, la principale source belge montre quelques photos de l’Ouvroir. [2]
«War bread» (Pain de guerre) d’Edward Eyre Hunt, commémore l’Ouvroir de ce délégué américain de la Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) dans la province d’Anvers. C’était un jeune journaliste et écrivain; il a travaillé à Anvers de décembre 1914 jusqu’à octobre 1915. [3]
«Women of Belgium» (Femmes de la Belgique) de Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman (Grand Island, Nebraska, 1874 – Californie 08.05.1960). Elle était également une déléguée CRB – ​​unique en tant que la seule déléguée féminine – et est restée en Belgique entre juillet et novembre 1916. En tant qu’écrivain et militante, elle s’est engagée pour la bonne cause des femmes belges. [4]

Edward Hunt, War bread
En automne 1914, trois femmes prennent l’initiative de créer un atelier de confection pour venir en aide aux habitants de la ville d’Anvers, soient Mesdames:
– Laure de Montigny-de Wael (Anvers 29.11.1869 – Ixelles, Bruxelles 09.07.1926)
– Anna Osterrieth-Lippens (Gand 01.11.1877 – Bruxelles 14.09.1957)
– La comtesse Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer née Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem (Gand 17.12.1857 – Anvers 21.04.1938)

Elles ont dirigé un comité de femmes qui, je suppose, étaient expérimentées dans l’organisation d’organismes de bienfaisance et de maisons de travail. Même avant la guerre, il y avait de nombreuses initiatives privées offrant des emplois et de l’éducation aux jeunes femmes et une assistance aux personnes dans le besoin. Le comité aurait acheté toutes les marchandises à la pièce qu’on pouvait trouver dans la ville et avait mis en service le théâtre des Folies Bergères pour fournir du travail à des centaines de jeunes femmes pour fabriquer et réparer des vêtements.

La Fondation Rockefeller

La Fondation Rockefeller et le CRB ont collaboré aux efforts de secours. Belgian Relief Bulletin, 5 décembre 1914. Coll. Archives de la Ville de Bruxelles. Photo: auteur

La fondation américaine «Rockefeller Foundation» a collectionné des vêtements aux États-Unis et les a expédiés par le port de Rotterdam vers la Belgique. Le Canada a également assuré le transport des vêtements.

Citation de «War bread»: «Avant le premier janvier 1915, la Fondation Rockefeller a contribué près d’un million de dollars au travail de secours belge et a créé une station à Rotterdam appelée la «Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission», pour aider la Commission for Relief in Belgium. Cette station était chargée du tri et de l’expédition des vêtements envoyés de l’Amérique à la Belgique.
La CRB n’avait jamais eu assez pour les fournir. Ce n’est que lorsque les généreux dons de vêtements ont commencé à venir d’Amérique par le biais de la Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission, que la situation s’est améliorée.»

L’Ouvroir d’Anvers était sous la protection de la CRB et recevait une subvention mensuelle de 50 000 francs de la ville d’Anvers jusqu’à ce que le Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation (CNSA) prenne en charge le financement.

Exposition Internationale d’Art Culinaire & d’Alimentation en 1899, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Anvers. Photo: internet

L’Ouvroir a déménagé dans des locaux plus grands: la Salle des Fêtes de la Société Royale d’Harmonie sur la Mechelsesteenweg.[5]
L’architecte Pieter Dens a conçu le bâtiment, achevé en 1846. L’endroit avait abrité des concerts, des expositions et des foires.

La Salle des Fêtes, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Anvers, 1906, carte postale. Photo: internet


L’Ouvroir à la Salle des Fêtes «Harmonie»

Edward Eyre Hunt, photo: ‘WWI Crusaders’, Jeffrey Miller

Hunt dresse ce tableau de l’organisation de l’ouvroir: «La scène de l’Harmonie anversoise était remplie de caisses de marchandises. Les galeries et le rez-de-chaussée ont été étalées avec des rangées de machines à coudre et de tables de travail, et le vestiaire a été transformé en un bain désinfectant à la vapeur et au soufre, où tous les matériaux, nouveaux et anciens, ont été démontés et soigneusement nettoyés. Neuf cents filles et jeunes femmes travaillaient sous surveillance dans la salle chaude et bien éclairée, tandis qu’environ trois mille femmes plus âgées se voyaient confier la couture à domicile.
Un groupe de cordonniers fabriquait et réparait des chaussures dans le couloir. Tous ces ouvriers étaient payés. De l’atelier central, les produits fabriqués et les matériaux non fabriqués ont été expédiés dans toute la province; le second aux cercles de couture dans les villages et les villes.»

L’Ouvroir d’Anvers, rez-de-chaussée, 1915. Photo: «Heures de Détresse»
Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman. Photo: internet

Charlotte Kellogg: Women of Belgium

Charlotte Kellogg est allée visiter l’atelier. «Nous avons vu une mer de têtes blondes dorées et brunes courbées sur leurs tables de couture. Des femmes nobles les ont sauvées des décombres de la guerre — dans l’abri de ce music-hall elles travaillaient pour leur vie … 1200 filles préparaient la couture et le matériel de broderie pour 3 300 autres personnes travaillant à domicile, c’est-à-dire c’était un des ouvroirs ou ateliers bénis de la Belgique.
Ici, toute l’attitude envers les vêtements est du point de vue, non pas de la protection qu’ils offrent, mais de l’emploi qu’ils offrent. Sans cet emploi, sans le dévouement quotidien des femmes merveilleuses qui ont fondé cette organisation étonnante…. Bien sûr, il y a toujours un besoin urgent pour les vêtements achevés. Ceux-ci sont remis aussi vite que possible aux divers autres comités qui s’occupent des démunis. Entre février 1915 et mai 1916, des articles d’une valeur de plus de 2 000 000 de francs furent ainsi distribués par ce seul ouvroir.»

Photo festive de sacs de farine provenant de moulins aux États-Unis et au Canada. Photo: «Heures de Détresse»

Transformation des sacs à farine
Kellogg n’a pas mentionné si les sacs à farine ont été transformés en vêtements dans l’Ouvroir; probablement pas. Cependant, certaines femmes étaient impliquées dans la broderie!
La broderie des sacs à farine dans l’Ouvroir a attiré l’attention de Kellogg:

Sac à farine «ABC», broderie scénique, dessin Piet van Engelen. Dédié à M. Herbert Hoover, Ouvroir d’Anvers. Coll. et photo: HHPLM nr. 62.4.447

«Dans une seule section les filles ne font que broder nos sacs à farine américains. Les artistes dessinent des dessins pour représenter la gratitude de la Belgique envers les États-Unis. Celui-ci sur le chevalet en passant, représentait le lion et le coq de la Belgique gardant la couronne du roi, tandis que le soleil – le grand aigle américain se lève à l’Est. Les sacs qui ne sont pas envoyés en Amérique comme cadeaux sont vendus en Belgique comme des souvenirs »

Les ouvrières étaient récompensées par une formation en couture et en dessin de patron; des cours d’histoire, de géographie, de littérature, d’écriture et une attention particulière à l’hygiène, plus un paiement de 3 francs par semaine.
Kellogg a exulté: «Ces choses sont splendides, et avec les trois francs de salaire par semaine, c’est le respect de soi, le courage, le progrès sur toute la ligne. Le comité a toujours été en mesure d’obtenir l’argent pour les salaires. »

Ouvroir d’Anvers, galerie, 1915. Photo: «Heures de Détresse»

La Comtesse Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem
La semaine dernière, j’ai reçu un message de l’un des arrière-petits-fils de la Comtesse Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer née Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem, membre du comité de l’Ouvroir. Auparavant j’étais entrée en contact avec M. van de Werve de Vorsselaer pendant mes recherches sur le nom de jeune fille de la comtesse van de Werve de Vorsselaer et son implication dans des comités caritatifs. Son arrière-grand-mère s’est avérée très active dans les œuvres caritatives pendant la guerre.

Comtesse Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer, née Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem. Photo: coll. van de Werve de Vorsselaer

«La comtesse van de Werve de Vorsselaer en question est née Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem (1857-1938). Elle a épousé le comte Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer (1851-1920) le 23 avril 1877 à Mariakerke. Ils ont eu deux fils.
Elle était membre de la Congrégation du Cœur Immaculé de Marie, de l’Association des Mères Chrétiennes et de l’Hospitalité de Notre-Dame de Lourdes. Elle était aussi Chevalier de l’Ordre de Léopold II avec étoile d’argent et avait été décorée de la Médaille Commémorative de la Guerre 1914-1918 et de la Médaille de la Victoire. Elle devait ces distinctions honorifiques à son dévouement sans bornes aux blessés de guerre qu’elle avait réconfortés, soulagés et qu’elle soignait dans les salles du Jardin Zoologique transformées pour la circonstance en hôpital militaire.» [6]

Le message que je viens de recevoir de M. van de Werve de Vorsselaer contenait une surprise. Il avait parlé à sa femme de nos conversations et elle se souvenait que sa mère lui avait donné des sacs à farine décorés. À sa grande surprise, trois sacs à farine brodés avaient émergé, dont l’existence ne lui était pas familière.
Il a eu la gentillesse de m’envoyer des photos des broderies.

Sac à farine brodé «Ouvroir d’Anvers»

«Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de guerre 1914-1916 ». Détail de sac à farine dans les techniques de broderie blanche. Coll. et photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

L’examen des photos m’a fait sursauter de joie: sur un des sacs a été brodé en blanc sur blanc: «Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916». L’impression originale du sac à farine est manquante, mais en taille c’est la toile d’un demi-sac à farine. Incontestablement un artisanat d’origine de l’Ouvroir d’Anvers!

«Sac à farine », napperon en technique de broderie blanche, broderie anglaise, «Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de guerre 1914-1916 ». Coll. et photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

C’est une napperon avec des motifs floraux, décorée de bords festonnés partout, exécutée dans des techniques de broderie blanche, dont le style ressemble à la broderie anglaise.

Étant donné qu’un sac à farine était originaire de l’Ouvroir, je suppose que les deux autres broderies y ont également été créées. Ces sacs à farine ont été transformés en housses de coussin.

Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphie

Sac à farine «Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphie», brodé; Ouvroir d’Anvers; coussin. Coll. et photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

L’origine d’un sac à farine est le «Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphie», de l’état de Pennsylvanie. Les caractères de l’impression originale sont brodés dans les couleurs rouge, jaune, noir et rouge, blanc, bleu. Quelques petits drapeaux ont été ajoutés comme décoration patriotique, ainsi que les années 1914-1915-1916-1917. Le résultat est une housse de coussin colorée.

American Commission

Détail sac à farine «American Commission», technique de broderie blanche, broderie italienne; Ouvroir d’Anvers. Coll. et photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer
Impression originale «American Commission». Coll. Hollaert. Photo: auteur

Un sac à farine provient de l’ «American Commission». L’impression d’origine était bleue, mais cette couleur s’est estompée. Ce sac décoré est devenu un coussin, il présente également les techniques de broderie blanche; cela ressemble à de la broderie italienne. Les contours des lettres majuscules sont brodés de fils blancs. De plus, le sac à farine a été habilement décoré de feuilles et de fleurs.

 

Conclusion
M. van de Werve de Vorsselaer a déclaré dans son explication accompagnant les photos des sacs à farine qu’il ne connaissait ni l’existence ni l’origine de leur collection de sacs à farine décorés. Il m’a remercié avec: «Grâce à vous, mes enfants et petits-enfants sauront leur provenance.»

Sac à farine «American Commission», technique de broderie blanche, broderie italienne. Ouvroir d’Anvers; coussin. Coll. et photo: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

A mon tour je tiens à remercier M. et Mme van de Werve de Vorsselaer. Mes questions de recherche: «qui ont brodé les sacs à farine, où les ont-elles brodés, quelle était leur motivation?» ont reçu des réponses significatives. Grâce à la collection de trois sacs à farine brodés, le travail de l’arrière-grand-mère van de Werve de Vorsselaer et de milliers d’autres filles et femmes de l’Ouvroir d’Anvers a repris vie.

Pour la suite, voir le blog: Het ‘Ouvroir’ van Antwerpen (2)

[1] Mes remerciements vont à
– M. et Mme van de Werve de Vorsselaer pour leur information et les photos des sacs à farine décorés;
– M. Hubert Bovens à Wilsele pour avoir fourni des données biographiques;
– Mme Majo van der Woude de Tree of Needlework à Utrecht pour ses conseils sur les différentes techniques de broderie;
– Mme Karina van Erven Dorens née van Ditzhuyzen pour avoir lu et corrigé la traduction de ce blog en français.

[2] Picard, Edmond, Heures de Détresse. L’Oeuvre du Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation et de la Commission for Relief in Belgium. Belgique 1914 – 1915. Bruxelles: CNSA, L’ Imprimerie J -E Goossens SA, 1915

[3] Hunt, Edward E., War bread. A Personal Narrative of the War and Relief in Belgium. New York: Henry Holt & Company 1916

[4] Kellogg, Charlotte, Women of Belgium. Turning Tragedy in Triumph. New York and London: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 4th edition, 1917

Salle des Fêtes Société Royale de l’Harmonie, Anvers, carte postale. Photo: internet

[5] Hunt a confondu deux lieux de la Société Royale de l’Harmonie dans «War bread»: la salle des Fêtes dans le parc de l’Harmonie sur la Mechelsesteenweg, à côté de l’actuel parc Roi Albert, et la salle de théâtre / concert au centre-ville Rue d’Arenberg. L’Ouvroir a été situé sur Mechelsesteenweg. (Annexe XXIX, The Clothing Workshop, p. 357)..

Comte Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer. Photo: «Le chant du paradis. Le Zoo d’Anvers a 150 ans»

[6] Les salles du ZOO d’Anvers ont été mises à la disposition de la Croix-Rouge en 1914.
Le comte Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer était impliqué dans la direction de la Société Royale de Zoologie d’Anvers depuis 1902 en tant qu’administrateur. En 1919, il devint président du conseil d’administration, mais mourut inopinément en 1920. Il semble que les deux époux, comme de nombreuses familles nobles et éminentes, avaient une relation étroite avec le célèbre Zoo d’Anvers. Baetens, Roland, Le chant du paradis. Le Zoo d’Anvers a 150 ans. Tielt: Lannoo, 1993.

Het ‘Ouvroir’ van Antwerpen (1) – Nederlands

Het ‘Ouvroir’ van Antwerpen gaf duizenden meisjes en vrouwen werk tijdens de bezetting van België. Er werd kleding gemaakt en vermaakt, schoenen gerepareerd én het was een plek waar werd geborduurd aan meelzakken.

Ouvroir van Antwerpen, iconische overzichtsfoto vanaf de galerij, 1915. Foto: ‘War Bread’

De betekenis van een ‘ouvroir’ is: ‘Lieu réservé aux ouvrages de couture, de broderie…, dans une communauté’; vertaald: ‘Plaats voor naaien, borduren…, in een gemeenschap’. In historische context zou ik het willen noemen een ‘gemeenschappelijk naaiatelier’.

De geschiedenis van het Ouvroir van Antwerpen is me bekend uit drie primaire bronnen: een Belgische en twee Amerikaanse.
– ‘Heures de Détresse’ van Edmond Picard, de Belgische primaire bron toont enkele foto’s van het Ouvroir.[2]
– ‘War Bread’ van Edward Eyre Hunt geeft de herinnering aan het Ouvroir van deze Amerikaanse gedelegeerde van de Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) in de provincie Antwerpen. Hij was een jonge journalist en schrijver; hij werkte in Antwerpen van december 1914 tot oktober 1915.[3]
– ‘Women of Belgium’ van Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman (Grand Island, Nebraska, 1874 – Californië 08.05.1960). Ook zij was gedelegeerde van de CRB – uniek als de enige vrouw – en verbleef tussen juli en november 1916 in België. Als schrijfster en activiste zette zij zich in voor de goede zaak van de Belgische vrouwen.[4]

Edward Hunt, War Bread
Drie vrouwen hebben najaar 1914 het initiatief genomen tot de oprichting van een kleding-atelier voor hulpverlening aan bewoners van de stad Antwerpen.

  • Laure de Montigny-de Wael (Antwerpen 29.11.1869 – Elsene, Brussel 09.07.1926)
  • Anna Osterrieth-Lippens (Gent 01.11.1877 – Brussel 14.09.1957)
  • Gravin Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem (Gent 17.12.1857 – Antwerpen 21.04.1938)

Zij gaven leiding aan een comité van dames dat, naar ik aanneem, ervaring had in de organisatie van liefdadigheid en werkhuizen. Ook voor de oorlog waren er talloze particuliere initiatieven die werkgelegenheid en leertrajecten boden aan jonge vrouwen en hulp gaven aan behoeftige mensen. Het comité zou alle manufacturen hebben opgekocht, die ze in de stad kon vinden en het theater Folies Bergères in gebruik hebben genomen om honderden jonge vrouwen werk te verstrekken door kleding te maken en te herstellen.

Rockefeller Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation en de CRB werkten gezamenlijk aan de de hulpacties. Belgian Relief Bulletin, 5 december 1914. Coll. Stadsarchief Brussel. Foto: auteur

De Amerikaanse Rockefeller Foundation zamelde kleding in in de VS en verstuurde deze via de haven van Rotterdam naar België. Ook Canada voorzag in kledingtransporten.
Citaat uit ‘War Bread’: ‘Vóór 1 januari 1915 droeg de Rockefeller Foundation bijna een miljoen dollar bij aan het werk van de Belgische hulpverlening en richtte een eigen voorziening op in Rotterdam, de Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission genaamd, om de CRB te ondersteunen. Zij hadden de leiding over het sorteren en verzenden van kleding die vanuit Amerika naar België werd gestuurd. De CRB had nooit genoeg kleding om de Belgen te leveren. Pas toen via de Rockefeller Foundation War Relief Commission de overvloedige donaties kleding uit Amerika begonnen te komen, verbeterde de situatie.’

Het Ouvroir stond onder bescherming van de CRB en ontving een maandelijkse subsidie van de stad Antwerpen van 50.000 francs tot het Nationaal Komiteit Hulp- en Voeding (NKHV) de financiering overnam.

Exposition Internationale d’Art Culinaire & d’Alimentation in 1899, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Antwerpen. Foto: internet

Het Ouvroir verhuisde naar een groter pand: het Zomerlokaal of de Feestzaal van de Koninklijke Maatschappij Harmonie (Société Royale d’Harmonie) aan de Mechelsesteenweg.[5]
De architect Pieter Dens ontwierp het gebouw, opgeleverd in 1846. Er werden naast concerten ook tentoonstellingen en beurzen georganiseerd.

De Feestzaal, Société Royale d’Harmonie, Antwerpen, 1906, postkaart. Foto: internet

Het Ouvroir in Feestzaal Harmonie

Edward Eyre Hunt, foto: ‘WWI Crusaders’, Jeffrey Miller

Hunt geeft dit beeld van de organisatie van het Ouvroir: ‘Het podium van de Antwerpse Harmonie stond vol met dozen met goederen. De galerijen en parterre waren volgezet met rijen naaimachines en werktafels, en de garderobe werd omgetoverd tot een stoom- en zwavelontsmettingsbad, waar alle materialen, nieuw en oud, uit elkaar werden gehaald en grondig werden gereinigd. Negenhonderd meisjes en jonge vrouwen werkten onder toezicht in de warme, goed verlichte hal, terwijl ongeveer drieduizend oudere vrouwen naaiwerk kregen om thuis te doen. Een groep schoenmakers in de gang maakte en repareerde schoenen.
Al deze arbeiders werden betaald. Vanuit de centrale werkplaats werden gereed goed en materialen door de hele provincie gedistribueerd; de materialen waren bestemd voor naai-ateliers in de dorpen en steden.’

Ouvroir van Antwerpen, parterre, 1915. Foto: ‘Heures de Détresse’
Charlotte Kellogg, née Hoffman. Foto: internet

Charlotte Kellogg: Women of Belgium
Charlotte Kellogg ging op bezoek in het atelier.
‘We keken naar een zee van goudblonde en bruine hoofden die over hun naaitafels bogen. Nobele vrouwen hadden hen uit de wrakstukken van de oorlog gered -binnen de bescherming van deze Muziekzaal werkten ze voor hun leven… 1200 meisjes maakten het naai- en borduurmateriaal klaar voor 3.300 anderen die thuis werkten. Met andere woorden, dit was een van de zegenrijke ouvroirs of werkplaatsen van België.
Hier is de hele houding ten opzichte van het kledingwerk niet die van de bescherming die het geeft, maar van de werkgelegenheid die het biedt. Zonder dit werk, zonder de dagelijkse toewijding van de fantastische vrouwen die deze ontzagwekkende organisatie hebben opgebouwd….
Natuurlijk is er altijd grote behoefte aan de gereedgekomen kledingstukken. Die worden zo snel mogelijk doorgegeven aan de andere comités die voor de behoeftigen zorgen. Tussen februari 1915 en mei 1916 werden alleen al via deze Ouvroir kleding en materialen ter waarde van meer dan 2.000.000 franken uitgedeeld.’

Feestelijke foto van volle meelzakken afkomstig van maalderijen uit de VS en Canada. Foto: ‘Heures de Détresse’

Transformatie van meelzakken
Kellogg vermeldde niet of er in het Ouvroir meelzakken tot kleding werden getransformeerd, vermoedelijk dus niet. Geborduurd werd er wel!

Het borduren van de meelzakken in het Ouvroir trok de aandacht van Kellogg:

Versierde meelzak ‘Haan op eikentak in ochtendgloren’, schilderachtig borduurwerk, ontwerp Piet van Engelen. Opgedragen aan Mr. Herbert Hoover, Ouvroir d’Anvers. Coll. en foto: HHPLM nr. 62.4.447

In één afdeling doen de meisjes niets anders dan onze Amerikaanse meelzakken borduren. Kunstenaars tekenen ontwerpen om de dankbaarheid van België aan de Verenigde Staten uit te drukken. Het ontwerp op de schildersezel waar we langsliepen, stelde de leeuw en de haan van België voor, die de kroon van de koning bewaakten, terwijl de zon – de grote Amerikaanse adelaar- opkomt in het oosten. Zakken die niet als cadeau naar Amerika worden verzonden, worden in België als aandenken verkocht.’*)

De beloning voor de werksters waren opleidingen in naaien en patroonontwerp; lessen in geschiedenis, aardrijkskunde, literatuur, schrijven en speciale aandacht voor hygiëne, plus een betaling van 3 franken per week. Kellogg jubelde: ‘Dit is prachtig, het bevordert zelfrespect, moed en vooruitgang. Het comité heeft het geld voor het loon altijd veilig kunnen stellen.’

Ouvroir van Antwerpen, galerij, 1915. Foto: ‘Heures de Détresse’

Gravin Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem
Vorige week ontving ik bericht van een van de achterkleinzonen van Gravin Irène van de Werve de Vorsselaer-Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem, een comité-lid van het Ouvroir. Ik was met de heer van de Werve de Vorsselaer eerder in contact gekomen in mijn onderzoek naar de meisjesnaam van ‘Comtesse van de Werve de Vorsselaer’ en haar betrokkenheid bij charitatieve comité’s. Zijn overgrootmoeder bleek tijdens de oorlog zeer actief te zijn geweest in liefdadigheidswerken.

Gravin Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer, née Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem. Foto: coll. van de Werve de Vorsselaer

‘De Gravin van de Werve de Vorsselaer in kwestie was geboren Irène Kervyn d’Oud Mooreghem. Ze trouwde met graaf Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer (1851-1920) op 23 april 1877 te Mariakerke. Ze kregen twee zoons.
Ze was lid van de Congregatie van het Onbevlekt Hart van Maria, van de Association des Mères Chrétiennes en van l’Hospitalité de Notre-Dame de Lourdes. Ze was ook Ridder in de Orde van Leopold II met zilveren ster en was onderscheiden met de Herinneringsmedaille aan de Oorlog 1914-1918 (Frankrijk) en de Overwinningsmedaille. Deze onderscheidingen had ze te danken aan haar grenzeloze toewijding aan de oorlogsgewonden die ze had getroost, hun pijn verzacht en die ze verzorgde in de zalen van de Antwerpse Zoo, die voor de gelegenheid waren omgevormd tot een geïmproviseerd militair hospitaal.’[6]

Het bericht dat ik nu ontving van de heer van de Werve de Vorsselaer bevatte een verrassing. Hij had met zijn vrouw gesproken over ons contact en zij herinnerde zich dat zijn moeder haar enkele versierde meelzakken had gegeven. Tot zijn grote verbazing waren drie geborduurde meelzakken tevoorschijn gekomen, waarvan hij het bestaan niet kende.
Daarom stuurde hij mij foto’s van de borduurwerken.

Geborduurde meelzak ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers’

‘Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916’. Detail meelzak in witborduurtechnieken. Coll. en foto: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

Beschouwing van de foto’s gaf mij reden tot vreugde: op één ervan stond wit op wit geborduurd: ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916’. De originele bedrukking van de meelzak ontbreekt, maar het is in afmeting het doek van een halve meelzak. Onbetwist een handwerk uit het Ouvroir van Antwerpen!

‘Meelzak’, tafelkleedje in witborduurtechniek, Engels borduren, ‘Ouvroir d’Anvers. Années de Guerre 1914-1916’. Coll. en foto: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

Het is een klein tafelkleed met bloemmotieven rondom versierd met schulpranden, uitgevoerd in witborduurtechnieken, de stijl lijkt Engels borduren.

Met één meelzak die met zekerheid in het Ouvroir is bewerkt, neem ik aan dat ook de andere twee borduurwerken er tot stand zijn gekomen. Het zijn meelzakken geweest, getransformeerd tot kussenovertrekken.

Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia

Meelzak ‘Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia’, geborduurd. Ouvroir van Antwerpen. Coll. en foto: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

Een meelzak heeft als origine de ‘Quaker City Flour Mills Co., Philadelphia’ in de staat Pennsylvania. De letters van de originele bedrukking zijn geborduurd in de kleuren rood, geel, zwart en rood, wit, blauw. Enkele kleine vlaggen zijn als patriottische versiering toegevoegd, evenals de jaartallen 1914-1915-1916-1917. Het resultaat is een kleurrijk kussenovertrek.

American Commission

Meelzak ‘American Commission’, detail witborduurtechniek, Italiaans borduren. Ouvroir van Antwerpen. Coll. en foto: van de Werve de Vorsselaer
Originele bedrukking meelzak ‘American Commission’. Coll. Hollaert. Foto: auteur

Een meelzak heeft als origine de ‘American Commission’. De originele bedrukking was blauw, maar die kleur is weg. Ook dit is uitgevoerd in de witborduurtechnieken; het lijkt Italiaans borduren. De contouren van de letters zijn met wit geborduurd. Verder is de meelzak kunstig bewerkt met bladeren en bloemen.

Tot slot
De heer van de Werve de Vorsselaer gaf in zijn toelichting bij de foto’s van de meelzakken aan dat hij noch het bestaan, noch de achtergrond van hun collectie versierde meelzakken kende. Hij bedankte mij met: “Grâce à vous, mes enfants et petits-enfants sauront leur provenance.” (“Dankzij u zullen mijn kinderen en kleinkinderen hun oorsprong kennen.”)

Meelzak ‘American Commission’, witborduurtechniek, Italiaans borduren. Ouvroir van Antwerpen; kussenovertrek. Coll. en foto: van de Werve de Vorsselaer

Op mijn beurt wil ik de heer en mevrouw van de Werve de Vorsselaer bedanken. Mijn onderzoeksvragen: wie hebben de meelzakken geborduurd, waar deden ze dat, wat was hun motivatie, hebben betekenisvolle antwoorden gekregen. Dankzij de collectie van drie geborduurde meelzakken kwam het werk van overgrootmoeder van de Werve de Vorsselaer en van duizenden meisjes en vrouwen in het Ouvroir van Antwerpen weer tot leven.

Vervolg
Voor het vervolg zie het blog:
Het ‘Ouvroir’ van Antwerpen (2)
*) Een derde blog over de meelzak ‘Haan op eikentak in ochtendgloren’ ontworpen door de Belgische kunstenaar Piet Van Engelen en geborduurd in het Ouvroir d’Anvers publiceerde ik op 17 februari 2021.

Voetnoten:
[1] Mijn dank gaat uit naar
– de heer en mevrouw van de Werve de Vorsselaer voor hun informatie en de foto’s van de versierde meelzakken;
– Hubert Bovens in Wilsele voor het verstrekken van biografische gegevens;
Majo van der Woude van Tree of Needlework in Utrecht voor haar advies over de diverse borduurtechnieken.

[2] Picard, Edmond, Heures de Détresse. L’Oeuvre du Comité National de Secours et d’Alimentation et de la Commission for Relief in Belgium. Belgique 1914 – 1915. Bruxelles: CNSA, L’ Imprimerie J -E Goossens SA, 1915

[3] Hunt, Edward E., War bread. A Personal Narrative of the War and Relief in Belgium. New York: Henry Holt & Company 1916

[4] Kellogg, Charlotte, ‘Women of Belgium. Turning Tragedy in Triumph’. New York and London: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 4th edition, 1917

Feestzaal der Koninklijke Maatschappij Harmonie, Antwerpen, postkaart. Foto: internet

[5] Hunt verwarde in ‘War Bread’ twee locaties van de Koninklijke Harmonie: het Zomerlokaal aan de Mechelsesteenweg in het Harmonie Park, grenzend aan het huidige Koning Albertpark, en de schouwburg/concertzaal in het stadscentrum aan de Arenbergstraat/Rue d’Arenberg. Het Ouvroir was gevestigd aan de Mechelsesteenweg. (Appendix XXIX, The Clothing Workshop, p. 357).

Graaf Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer. Foto: De Roep van het Paradijs. 150 jaar Antwerpse Zoo

[6] De zalen van de ZOO waren in 1914 ter beschikking gesteld van het Rode Kruis.
Graaf Léon van de Werve de Vorsselaer was sinds 1902 als beheerder bij het bestuur van de Koninklijke Maatschappij voor Dierkunde in Antwerpen (KMDA) betrokken. In 1919 werd hij voorzitter van het bestuur, maar overleed onverwachts in 1920. Beide echtelieden bleken dus, zoals vele vooraanstaande en adellijke families, een nauwe band te hebben met de Zoo, de befaamde dierentuin van Antwerpen. Baetens, Roland, De Roep van het Paradijs. 150 jaar Antwerpse Zoo. Tielt: Lannoo, 1993

Flour sack trip from Urbana to Overijse

For my flour sack trip to the Flemish Brabant town of Overijse I took the digital highway. The journey went via the American city of Urbana in Ohio. Later I made a detour through West-Branch, Iowa. Please note: The old spelling of Overijse is “Overijssche”.

“Grateful schoolchildren in Overijssche”, around 1915/1916. In the background some flour sacks can be seen hanging.Photo: postcard commemoration of the Great War 1914-2014. De Beierij vzw.
Diplomat Brand Whitlock and his wife Ella Brainerd-Whitlock with her dog. Photo: Library of Congress

Urbana, Ohio
The Champaign County Historical Society Museum (CCHSM) in Urbana preserves a collection of objects obtained through the couple Brand Whitlock (Urbana, Ohio 04.03.1869 – Cannes, France 24.05.1934) and Ella Brainerd-Whitlock (Springfield, Ill. 25.09.1876 – Brewster, NY 11.07.1942). The diplomat Brand Whitlock was an American minister plenipotentiary in Belgium with headquarters in Brussels during WWI; he was patron of the Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) and the Belgian National Relief Committee (CNSA).
In gratitude for their work in Belgium the couple received many gifts, including decorated flour sacks.

Whitlock collection
All textile objects in CCHSM’s Whitlock collection have been described online, but photos are usually missing. Several descriptions made me suspect that the objects could be decorated flour sacks, two of which are specifically from the municipality of Overijse. When asked, Cheryl Ogden, director of the museum, was eager to help. Megan, the museum’s intern, sent me the photos.[1]

Embroidered flour sack “A son Excellence M. Brand Whitlock”, nr. 3999 in the CCHSM collection. Photo: CCHSM

“Nr. 3999:
32″ x 18” pillow top banner

The banner has the red, yellow, black banner of the Belgian flag. On the lower right hand there is tied an American Flag. The top is composed of a center design where one knight speaks to another on horseback. The knight has on a blue cape. Under them is a blue and yellow shield with a lion on it. There is a wheat design on the cloth. It says in red on it “A Son Excellence/ Brand Whtilock/ 1914/ Souvenir de Reconnaissance/ 1915 La commune d’ Overyssyche.” There are also stamps from its original use on it.”

 

 

Embroidered flour sack “Aux généreux Etats-Unis”, nr. 4002 in the CCHSM-collection. Photo: CCHSM

“Nr. 4002:
18″ x 30” embroidered pillowcase.

There is a card sewn into the front. It has a red, black, and yellow ribbon threaded through it. 
The Pillowcase is embroidered with a yellow basket that has red, yellow, balck flowers. The flowers curve down and around the side of the case. Inside the curve are American and Belgian flags. They are tied together by a yellow ribbon. The words Ausc generusc/ etats-unis/ souvenir de reconnaissance/ 1914 (-) 1915/ La commune d’ Fueryssche (?)/ Belgique (?).

Stamp Relief Committee Overijse. Coll. and photo CCHSM

The case manufacturer’s stamp is on the bottom.”

The flour sacks do not show any original prints referring to mills or American or Canadian relief organizations. The presentation, dimensions and double fabric of the objects seem to confirm that these are embroidered flour sacks. “La Commune d’Overijssche” was, according to the text, the initiator of both embroidered sacks; it dedicated one flour sack to Mr. Brand Whitlock, the other to the generous United States.

‘A son Excellence M. Brand Whitlock’, nr. 3999

Embroidered flour sack “A son Excellence M. Brand Whitlock. La Commune d’Overijssche”, 1915. Coll. and photo CCHSM nr. 3999
Detail embroidery. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Embroidered text: A son Excellence Mr. Brand Whitlock. Souvenir de reconnaissance 1914-1915. La commune d’ Overijssche.
Stamp: Comité local de Secours et d’Alimentation Overijssche (Brabant).
The embroiderer used red thread for the text.

Detail embroidery. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Garlands of golden grain stalks, white daisies, blue cornflowers and green ivy leaves form a wreath around the coat of arms of Overijse.

 

Detail with the coat of arms of Overijse. Coll. and photo CCHSM

The official coat of arms of Overijse dates from 1818: “In glaze a Saint Martin on horseback, sharing his cloak with a poor man, standing on a ground, all made of gold; in the tip a shield of glaze with a crossbar, accompanied in the shield head by three lilies and in the shield foot of a lion, all of gold.” In the embroidery, the cloak of Saint Martin is blue, the rest gold.

Stamp of Overijse. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Saint Martin on horseback appears again in the official stamp, in black ink, of the municipality of Overijssche on the flour sack. The edges are finished with ribbon in the colors red, yellow, black; the top edge is finished with needlework.

‘Aux généreux Etats-Unis’, nr. 4002

Embroidered flour sack “Aux généreux Etats-Unis. La Commune d’Overijssche”, 1915. Embroiderer Marie Brankaer. Coll. and photo CCHSM nr. 4002
Detail embroidery. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Embroidered text: Aux généreux Etats-Unis 1914-1915. La commune d’Overijssche, Belgique.
Stamp: Comité local de Secours et d’Alimentation Overijssche (Brabant).

 

Card with the name of the embroiderer Marie Brankaer, 1915. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Card with text: Mlle. Marie Brankaer, Malaise-sous-Overijssche, Brabant.
Added card by CCHSM: “Pillowcase Embroidered. Souvenir de Reconnaissance. Mrs. Brand Whitlock.”

 

Detail embroidery. Coll. and photo CCHSM

Marie Brankaer (born in Malazen 22.01.1898) was the daughter of butcher Jan Baptiste Brankaer and Maria Lamal. They lived in Steenweg Terhulpen 35. Maria was 17 years old when she embroidered the flour sack. She used golden yellow and red threads to embroider garlands of flowers, a basket with flowers; the patriotic elements are the Belgian and American flags, the poles cross one another and are connected with a strong golden-yellow bow. The top edge is finished with needlework.

 

Overijse, Flemish Brabant
I wondered: are the two flour sacks in the Whitlock collection known amongst those in Overijse, Belgium? To find the answer I turned to the local Historical Society De Beierij van IJse. They were not aware of the existence of these flour sacks. Piet Van San, vice-president of De Beierij van IJse however, provided me with an interesting article and beautiful photos.
In 2014, the magazine Zoniën paid attention to the needs of occupied Belgium. Djamila Timmermans wrote the article: “Honger, voedsel en hulp in Overijse, WO I” (Hunger, food and relief in Overijse, WWI). [2]  In 1915, the photographer Louis Rigaux (1887-1954) took a series of photos of the local Relief Committee and the activities. The photos have been kept in the archives of Jean and Isabelle Rigaux, they are included as illustrations in the Zoniën article.

The local Relief Committee “Overijssche”, 1915. Portrait with two decorated flour sacks. Photo: Louis Rigaux, coll. J&I Rigaux
Relief Committee Overijssche, 1915. Two decorated flour sacks “Chicago’s Flour Gift”, B.A. Eckhart Milling Co., Chicago, Illinois and “Pride of Niagara”, Thompson Milling Co. Lockport, New York. Coll. unknown. Detail photo: Louis Rigaux, coll. J&I Rigaux

The photo on the cover of Zoniën 2014-2 shows the local relief committee with two decorated flour sacks. The embroidery of garlands of corn stalks, daisies, cornflowers and ivy leaf is the same as the embroidery on the CCHSM flour sack No. 3999.

By whom and where the flour sacks in Overijse were embroidered is as of yet unknown. Perhaps the embroiderer’s name “Mlle. Marie Brankaer from Malaise-sous-Overijssche” could lead to further information.

Photos of Louis Rigaux [3]

Weighing the flour for further distribution. Overijse Municipal School.  Coll. J&I Rigaux, Photo: Louis Rigaux
Food distribution by the Overijse Relief Committee. Coll. J&I Rigaux, photo: Louis Rigaux
Queue for the Municipal Warehouse or ‘American Shop’, Justus Lipsiusplein, Overijse. Coll. J&I Rigaux, photo: Louis Rigaux
Members of the Overijse Relief Committee lined up in front of a wall full of emptied flour sacks with brand names of American mills and relief organizations. Coll. J&I Rigaux, photo: Louis Rigaux

Piet Van San drew my attention to two more decorated flour sacks: “We have two more elaborately crafted flour sacks (1915) in Overijse – of exceptional quality. One is kept in my wife’s family, another copy in the archives of the Historical Society De Beierij of which I am the vice-president.” As soon as I have scans of photos of these flour sacks, I will post them to this blog.

Through my research into decorated WWI flour sacks, I made an adventurous sack trip from Urbana to Overijse on the digital highway and met inspiring people.

Addition November 8, 2020
During another flour sack trip I took a short detour through West Branch, Iowa. The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum (HHPLM) appears to have a ‘Overijssche-Maleizen’ (‘Malaise-sous-Overijssche’) flour sack in its collection. A decorated flour sack from the village where embroiderer Marie Brankaer lived!

Decorated flour sack ‘Overijssche-Maleizen’, embroidered and painted, 1915. Coll. HHPLM nr. 62.4.385

‘Der Belgian Dank’, ‘Liefderijk Amerika’ (Thanks from Belgium, Loving America) is painted on the sack. The embroidered garland of flowers and stalks of grain are comparable to the ones on the other Overijssche sacks. Here too the top edge is finished with open stitching.

 

My sincere thanks go to
– Cheryl Ogden and Megan of the Champaign County Historical Society Museum;
– Piet Van San of the Historical Society De Beierij van IJse;
– Hubert Bovens for the search for biographical data of embroiderer Marie Brankaer

 

[1] Champaign County Historical Society owns several WWI flour sacks in its Brand Whitlock collection. How many is currently under investigation, though there appear to be at least seven pieces. Megan took and sent overview photos and detailed photos of these seven flour sacks.
More on their collection in this blog: Ohio: Helping the Belgians

[2] Timmermans, Djamila, Honger, voedsel en hulp in Overijse, WO I. Overijse: Zoniën, quarterly magazine Historical Society De Beierij van IJse vzw, 2014-2, p. 47-75.
Djamila Timmermans wrote the article “Milddadigheid” van de stad Portland (Generosity of the city of Portland), Oregon, in the same issue, focusing on the unveiling of a memorial stone in Overijse in 1930: “the memorial stone, placed at the Municipal School of ‘t Center, in gratitude to the generosity of the city of Portland (Oregon) America, during the war 1914-1918”.

[3] In Diane De Keyzer’s book “Nieuwe meesters, magere tijden. Eten en drinken tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog” (New masters, lean times. Eating and drinking during World War I) 14 photos are printed, taken by Louis Rigaux. She quotes on p. 244 from the minutes of the meetings of the Overijssche relief committee, written by the secretary, notary public Goedhuys: “Comité d’alimentation – Procès-verbaux des séances 11.01.1915 – 10.01.1916.